You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults’ transport-related walking and cycling: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium

Van Dyck, Delfien, Cerin, Ester, Conway, Terry L., De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse, Owen, Neville, Kerr, Jacqueline, Cardon, Greet, Frank, Lawrence D., Saelens, Brian E. and Sallis, James F. 2012, Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults’ transport-related walking and cycling: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 9, no. 70, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-9-70.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
cerin-perceivedneighborhood-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 238.84KB 36

Title Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with adults’ transport-related walking and cycling: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium
Author(s) Van Dyck, Delfien
Cerin, Ester
Conway, Terry L.
De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
Owen, Neville
Kerr, Jacqueline
Cardon, Greet
Frank, Lawrence D.
Saelens, Brian E.
Sallis, James F.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 9
Issue number 70
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) physical activity
ecological model
NEWS
walkability
Summary Background : Active transportation has the potential to contribute considerably to overall physical activity levels in adults and is likely to be influenced by neighborhood-related built environment characteristics. Previous studies that examined the associations between built environment attributes and active transportation, focused mainly on transport-related walking and were conducted within single countries, limiting environmental variability. We investigated the direction and shape of relationships of perceived neighborhood attributes with transport-related cycling and walking in three countries; and examined whether these associations differed by country and gender.

Methods Data from the USA (Baltimore and Seattle), Australia (Adelaide) and Belgium (Ghent) were pooled. In total, 6,014 adults (20–65 years, 55.7% women) were recruited in high-/low-walkable and high-/low-income neighborhoods. All participants completed the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalized additive mixed models were used to estimate the strength and shape of the associations.

Results Proximity to destinations, good walking and cycling facilities, perceiving difficulties in parking near local shopping areas, and perceived aesthetics were included in a ‘cyclability’ index. This index was linearly positively related to transport-related cycling and no gender- or country-differences were observed. The ‘walkability’ index consisted of perceived residential density, land use mix access, proximity of destinations and aesthetics. A non-linear positive relationship with transport-related walking was found. This association was stronger in women than in men, and country-specific associations were identified: the strongest association was observed in Seattle, the weakest in Adelaide. In Ghent, the association weakened at higher levels of walkability.

Conclusions For cycling, consistent correlates were found in the three countries, but associations were less straightforward for transport-related walking. Moreover, the identified neighborhood environmental correlates were different for walking compared to cycling. In order to further clarify the shape of these associations and reach more specific international guidelines for developing walkable and bikeable neighborhoods, future studies should include even more countries to maximize environmental variability.
Notes This paper was orginally presented at the 11th International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity in Austin, Texas on 23-26 May 2012.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-9-70
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30055822

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 39 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 153 Abstract Views, 36 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 10 Sep 2013, 13:02:18 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.