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Impact of an active video game on healthy children’s physical activity

Baranowski, Tom, Abdelsamad, Dina, Baranowski, Janice, O'Connor, Teresia Margareta, Thompson, Debbe, Barnett, Anthony, Cerin, Ester and Chen, Tzu-An 2012, Impact of an active video game on healthy children’s physical activity, Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 3, pp. 636-642, doi: 10.1542/peds.2011-2050.

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Title Impact of an active video game on healthy children’s physical activity
Author(s) Baranowski, Tom
Abdelsamad, Dina
Baranowski, Janice
O'Connor, Teresia Margareta
Thompson, Debbe
Barnett, Anthony
Cerin, Ester
Chen, Tzu-An
Journal name Pediatrics
Volume number 129
Issue number 3
Start page 636
End page 642
Total pages 7
Publisher American Academy of Pediatrics
Place of publication Elk Grove Village, Ill.
Publication date 2012-03-01
ISSN 0031-4005
1098-4275
Keyword(s) exergames
Wii
Summary OBJECTIVE: This naturalistic study tests whether children receiving a new (to them) active video game spontaneously engage in more physical activity than those receiving an inactive video game, and whether the effect would be greater among children in unsafe neighborhoods, who might not be allowed to play outside.

METHODS: Participants were children 9 to 12 years of age, with a BMI >50th percentile, but <99th percentile; none of these children a medical condition that would preclude physical activity or playing video games. A randomized clinical trial assigned children to receiving 2 active or 2 inactive video games, the peripherals necessary to run the games, and a Wii console. Physical activity was monitored by using accelerometers for 5 weeks over the course of a 13-week experiment. Neighborhood safety was assessed with a 12 item validated questionnaire.

RESULTS: There was no evidence that children receiving the active video games were more active in general, or at anytime, than children receiving the inactive video games. The outcomes were not moderated by parent perceived neighborhood safety, child BMI z score, or other demographic characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS: These results provide no reason to believe that simply acquiring an active video game under naturalistic circumstances provides a public health benefit to children.
Language eng
DOI 10.1542/peds.2011-2050
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, American Academy of Pediatrics
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30055831

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.