Severely obese people with diabetes experience impaired emotional well-being associated with socioeconomic disadvantage: results from diabetes MILES – Australia

Dixon, John B., Browne, Jessica L., Lambert, Gavin W., Jones, Kay M., Reddy, Prasuna, Pouwer, Frans and Speight, Jane 2013, Severely obese people with diabetes experience impaired emotional well-being associated with socioeconomic disadvantage: results from diabetes MILES – Australia, Diabetes research and clinical practice, vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 131-140.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Severely obese people with diabetes experience impaired emotional well-being associated with socioeconomic disadvantage: results from diabetes MILES – Australia
Author(s) Dixon, John B.
Browne, Jessica L.
Lambert, Gavin W.
Jones, Kay M.
Reddy, Prasuna
Pouwer, Frans
Speight, Jane
Journal name Diabetes research and clinical practice
Volume number 101
Issue number 2
Start page 131
End page 140
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier BV
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2013-08
ISSN 0168-8227
1872-8227
Keyword(s) depression
psychosocial comorbidity
severe obesity
socioeconomic disadvantage
type 2 diabetes
Summary Aim
To examine the emotional well-being of severely obese Australians with type 2 diabetes, along with markers of social and economic disadvantage, using the Diabetes MILES – Australia dataset.
Methods
Diabetes MILES – Australia was a national survey of 3338 adults with diabetes that focused on psychosocial issues; 1795 had type 2 diabetes and reported BMI. We extracted data regarding depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), obesity- and diabetes- related comorbidities, and demographics. The severely obese group (SOG) (BMI ≥ 35; median BMI = 41.6) constituted 530 (30%) of the type 2 diabetes respondents and was matched with 530 controls (CG) (BMI < 35; median BMI = 28.2). Within- and between- group trends were examined.
Results
The SOG had higher depression scores (median (IQR) 6.0 (3–12)) than CG (5.0 (2–10)); p < 0.001, and were more likely to report moderate-severe depressive symptoms (37% versus 27%; p < 0.001). The groups did not differ on anxiety. The SOG, compared with the CG, were more likely to live alone (21% versus 17%), receive a disability pension (21% versus 15%), earn ≤$40.000/year (51% versus 41%; all p < 0.05), and were less likely to be employed (46% versus 53%), university or higher educated (17% versus 26%), or have health insurance (50% versus 60%; all p ≤ 0.01). Moderate-severe depression was positively associated with cumulative stressors of severe obesity, socioeconomic disadvantage, and obesity- and diabetes- related comorbidity.
Conclusions
Severely obese people living with type 2 diabetes have cumulative stressors related to health, disability, demographic and socioeconomic factors, and impaired emotional well-being.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
111712 Health Promotion
111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30055995

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 48 Abstract Views, 8 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 12 Sep 2013, 17:28:09 EST by Claudia Gasch

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.