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Performance, personality, and energetics : correlation, causation, and mechanism

Careau, Vincent and Garland Jr., Theodore 2012, Performance, personality, and energetics : correlation, causation, and mechanism, Physiological and biochemical zoology, vol. 85, no. 6, November-December, pp. 543-571, doi: 10.1086/666970.

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Title Performance, personality, and energetics : correlation, causation, and mechanism
Author(s) Careau, Vincent
Garland Jr., Theodore
Journal name Physiological and biochemical zoology
Volume number 85
Issue number 6
Season November-December
Start page 543
End page 571
Total pages 29
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, Ill.
Publication date 2012-11
ISSN 1522-2152
1537-5293
Summary The study of phenotypic evolution should be an integrative endeavor that combines different approaches and crosses disciplinary and phylogenetic boundaries to consider complex traits and organisms that historically have been studied in isolation from each other. Analyses of individual variation within populations can act to bridge studies focused at the levels of morphology, physiology, biochemistry, organismal performance, behavior, and life history. For example, the study of individual variation recently facilitated the integration of behavior into the concept of a pace-of-life syndrome and effectively linked the field of energetics with research on animal personality. Here, we illustrate how studies on the pace-of-life syndrome and the energetics of personality can be integrated within a physiology-performance-behavior-fitness paradigm that includes consideration of ecological context. We first introduce key concepts and definitions and then review the rapidly expanding literature on the links between energy metabolism and personality traits commonly studied in nonhuman animals (activity, exploration, boldness, aggressiveness, sociability). We highlight some empirical literature involving mammals and squamates that demonstrates how emerging fields can develop in rather disparate ways because of historical accidents and/or particularities of different kinds of organisms. We then briefly discuss potentially interesting avenues for future conceptual and empirical research in relation to motivation, intraindividual variation, and mechanisms underlying trait correlations. The integration of performance traits within the pace-of-life-syndrome concept has the potential to fill a logical gap between the context dependency of selection and how energetics and personality are expected to interrelate. Studies of how performance abilities and/or aspects of Darwinian fitness relate to both metabolic rate and personality traits are particularly lacking.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/666970
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, University of Chicago Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056093

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.