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The energetic and oxidative costs of reproduction in a free-ranging rodent

Bergeron, Patrick, Careau, Vincent, Humphries, Murray M., Reale, Denis, Speakman, John R. and Garant, Dany 2011, The energetic and oxidative costs of reproduction in a free-ranging rodent, Functional ecology, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 1063-1071, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2011.01868.x.

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Title The energetic and oxidative costs of reproduction in a free-ranging rodent
Author(s) Bergeron, Patrick
Careau, Vincent
Humphries, Murray M.
Reale, Denis
Speakman, John R.
Garant, Dany
Journal name Functional ecology
Volume number 25
Issue number 5
Start page 1063
End page 1071
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2011-10
ISSN 0269-8463
1365-2435
Keyword(s) ageing
field metabolic rate
life-history theory
litter size
mammals
oxidative stress
wild population
Summary 1. As understanding of the energetic costs of reproduction in birds and mammals continues to improve, oxidative stress is an increasingly cited example of a non-energetic cost of reproduction that may serve as a proximal physiological link underlying life-history trade-offs.

2. Here, we provide the first study to measure daily energy expenditure (DEE) and oxidative damage in a wild population. We measured both traits on eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) and assessed their relationships with age, reproductive status, litter size and environmental conditions.

3. We found that both physiological traits were correlated with environmental characteristics (e.g. temperature, seasons). DEE tended to increase with decreasing temperature, while oxidative damage was lower in spring, after a winter of torpor expression, than in autumn. We also found that DEE decreased with age, while oxidative damage was elevated in young individuals, reduced in animals of intermediate age and tended to increase at older age.

4. After controlling for age and environmental variables, we found that both female DEE and oxidative damage increased with litter size, although the latter increased weakly.

5. Our results corroborate findings from laboratory studies but highlight the importance of considering environmental conditions, age and reproductive status in broader analyses of the causes and consequences of physiological costs of reproduction in wild animals.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2011.01868.x
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Wiley
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056101

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.