You are not logged in.

Testing dynamic variance-sensitive foraging using individual differences in basal metabolic rates of zebra finches

Mathot, Kimberley J., Godde, Sophie, Careau, Vincent, Thomas, Donald W. and Giraldeau, Luc-Alain 2009, Testing dynamic variance-sensitive foraging using individual differences in basal metabolic rates of zebra finches, Oikos, vol. 118, no. 4, pp. 545-552, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.17357.x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Testing dynamic variance-sensitive foraging using individual differences in basal metabolic rates of zebra finches
Author(s) Mathot, Kimberley J.
Godde, Sophie
Careau, Vincent
Thomas, Donald W.
Giraldeau, Luc-Alain
Journal name Oikos
Volume number 118
Issue number 4
Start page 545
End page 552
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2009-04
ISSN 0030-1299
1600-0706
Summary Social foragers can alternate between searching for food (producer tactic), and searching for other individuals that have located food in order to join them (scrounger tactic). Both tactics yield equal rewards on average, but the rewards generated by producer are more variable. A dynamic variance-sensitive foraging model predicts that social foragers should increase their use of scrounger with increasing energy requirements and/or decreased food availability early in the foraging period. We tested whether natural variation in minimum energy requirements (basal metabolic rate or BMR) is associated with differences in the use of producer–scrounger foraging tactics in female zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. As predicted by the dynamic variance-sensitive model, high BMR individuals had significantly greater use of the scrounger tactic compared with low BMR individuals. However, we observed no effect of food availability on tactic use, indicating that female zebra finches were not variance-sensitive foragers under our experimental conditions. This study is the first to report that variation in BMR within a species is associated with differences in foraging behaviour. BMR-related differences in scrounger tactic use are consistent with phenotype-dependent tactic use decisions. We suggest that BMR is correlated with another phenotypic trait which itself influences tactic use decisions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.17357.x
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056109

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 29 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 54 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 19 Sep 2013, 13:04:03 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.