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Basal metabolic rate of canidae from hot deserts to cold arctic climates

Careau, Vincent, Morand-Ferron, Julie and Thomas, Don 2007, Basal metabolic rate of canidae from hot deserts to cold arctic climates, Journal of mammalogy, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 394-400, doi: 10.1644/06-MAMM-A-111R1.1.

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Title Basal metabolic rate of canidae from hot deserts to cold arctic climates
Author(s) Careau, Vincent
Morand-Ferron, Julie
Thomas, Don
Journal name Journal of mammalogy
Volume number 88
Issue number 2
Start page 394
End page 400
Total pages 7
Publisher American Society of Mammalogists
Place of publication Provo, Ut.
Publication date 2007
ISSN 0022-2372
1545-1542
Keyword(s) basal metabolic rate
canids
carnivores
climate
phylogenetically independent contrasts
Summary Canids form the most widely distributed family within the order Carnivora, with members present in a multitude of different environments from cold arctic to hot, dry deserts. We reviewed the literature and compared 24 data sets available on the basal metabolic rate (BMR) of 12 canid species, accounting for body mass and climate, to examine inter- and intraspecific variations in mass-adjusted BMR between 2 extreme climates (arctic and hot desert). Using both conventional and phylogenetically independent analysis of covariance, we found that canids from the arctic climate zone had significantly higher mass-adjusted BMR than species from hot deserts. Canids not associated with either arctic or desert climates had an intermediate and more variable mass-adjusted BMR. The climate effect also was significant at the intraspecific level in species for which we had data in 2 different climates. Arctic and desert climates represent contrasting combinations of ambient temperatures and water accessibility that require opposite physiological adaptations in terms of metabolism. The fact that BMR varies within species when individuals are subjected to different climate regimes further suggests that climate is an important determinant of BMR.
Language eng
DOI 10.1644/06-MAMM-A-111R1.1
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, American Society of Mammalogists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056114

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.