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Bloods, Crips and Southern Cross Soldiers: we are all gangbangers now!

Johns, Amelia 2012, Bloods, Crips and Southern Cross Soldiers: we are all gangbangers now!, in YCC 2012 : Youth Cultures, belongings, transitions: bridging the gap in youth research : Proceedings of the Youth Cultures Conference 2012, Griffith University, Brisbane, Qld., pp. 1-1.

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Title Bloods, Crips and Southern Cross Soldiers: we are all gangbangers now!
Author(s) Johns, Amelia
Conference name Youth Cultures Conference (2012 : Brisbane, Qld.)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 22-24 Nov. 2012
Title of proceedings YCC 2012 : Youth Cultures, belongings, transitions: bridging the gap in youth research : Proceedings of the Youth Cultures Conference 2012
Editor(s) unknown
Publication date 2012
Conference series Youth Cultures Conference
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher Griffith University
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Keyword(s) gangs
violent youth subcultures
cultural identity
collective cultural belonging
Summary This paper presents findings from the author's PhD thesis exploring violent youth subcultures in Australia. It addresses whether growing uncertainties around issues of cultural identity and belonging in an era of risk has produced more defensive models of DIY youth culture at a local scale. Theoretically, the author examines whether globalisation has unsettled normative youth subject positions associated with the nation-state, problematising conventional logics of youth cultural formation (i.e. which view questions of race and racism through a white/black, mainstream/subculture binary). As Beck (1992;1999) argues, the de-bounding influence of globalisation has led to an ambivalent set of relations where forms of youth identity have become freed from the nation-state and class based forms of community and must be self-organised. In particular, he argues that this has produced cosmopolitan subjects and social movements as well as ‘counter-modern’ subjects and cultures. This paper applies Beck’s theories alongside theories focused on global/local influences on youth culture to an ethnographic study of two violent youth subcultures in Australia, these being the white ‘patriotic’ youth formation which emerged in the Cronulla riots and youth gang formations in Melbourne’s western suburbs. In doing so the author examines the extent to which violent youth subcultures in Australia can be regarded as strategic responses intended to restore forms of collective cultural belonging at a local scale vis a vis ‘the global’ and its destabilizing influences.
Language eng
Field of Research 200209 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies
Socio Economic Objective 959999 Cultural Understanding not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2012, Griffith University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056440

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Faculty of Arts and Education
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