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‘It would be okay if they came through the proper channels’: community perceptions and attitudes toward asylum seekers in Australia

McKay, Fiona H, Thomas, Samantha L and Kneebone, Susan 2012, ‘It would be okay if they came through the proper channels’: community perceptions and attitudes toward asylum seekers in Australia, Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 113-133, doi: 10.1093/jrs/fer010.

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Title ‘It would be okay if they came through the proper channels’: community perceptions and attitudes toward asylum seekers in Australia
Author(s) McKay, Fiona HORCID iD for McKay, Fiona H orcid.org/0000-0002-0498-3572
Thomas, Samantha LORCID iD for Thomas, Samantha L orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-7775
Kneebone, Susan
Journal name Journal of Refugee Studies
Volume number 25
Issue number 1
Start page 113
End page 133
Total pages 21
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, UK
Publication date 2012
ISSN 0951-6328
1471-6925
Keyword(s) Asylum seeker
Survey
Qualitative
Community perceptions
Attitudes
Summary Australia's humanitarian programme contributes to UNHCR's global resettlement programme and enhances Australia's international humanitarian reputation. However, as the recent tragedy on Christmas Island has shown, the arrival of asylum seekers by boat continues to stimulate debate, discussion and reaction from the Australian public and the Australian media. In this study, we used a mixed methods community survey to understand community perceptions and attitudes relating to asylum seekers. We found that while personal contact with asylum seekers was important when forming opinions about this group of immigrants, for the majority of respondents, attitudes and opinions towards asylum seekers were more influenced by the interplay between traditional Australian values and norms, the way that these norms appeared to be threatened by asylum seekers, and the way that these threats were reinforced both in media and political rhetoric.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/jrs/fer010
Field of Research 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
160805 Social Change
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056720

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Thu, 10 Oct 2013, 12:28:03 EST by Fiona Mckay

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.