Interventions designed to limit gestational weight gain: a systematic review of theory and meta-analysis of intervention components

Hill, Briony, Skouteris, Helen and Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M. 2013, Interventions designed to limit gestational weight gain: a systematic review of theory and meta-analysis of intervention components, Obesity reviews, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 435-450.

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Title Interventions designed to limit gestational weight gain: a systematic review of theory and meta-analysis of intervention components
Author(s) Hill, Briony
Skouteris, Helen
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M.
Journal name Obesity reviews
Volume number 14
Issue number 6
Start page 435
End page 450
Total pages 16
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2013-06
ISSN 1467-7881
1467-789X
Keyword(s) gestational weight gain
health behaviour change theory
meta-analysis
systematic review
Summary Limiting gestational weight gain (GWG) to recommended levels is important to optimize health outcomes for mother and baby. Surprisingly, a recent review revealed that theory-based interventions to limit GWG were less effective than interventions that did not report a theory-base; however, strict criteria were used to identify theory-informed studies. We extended this review and others by systematically evaluating the theories of behaviour change informing GWG interventions using a generalized health psychology perspective, and meta-analysing behaviour change techniques reported in the interventions. Interventions designed to limit GWG were searched for using health, nursing and psychology databases. Papers reporting an underpinning theory were identified and the CALO-RE taxonomy was used to determine individual behaviour change techniques. Nineteen studies were identified for inclusion. Eight studies were informed by a behaviour change theory; six reported favourable effects on GWG. Overall, studies based on theory were as effective as non–theory-based studies at limiting GWG. Furthermore, the provision of information, motivational interviewing, behavioural self-monitoring and providing rewards contingent on successful behaviour appear to be key strategies when intervening in GWG. Combining these behaviour change techniques with dietary interventions may be most effective. Future research should focus on determining the exact combination of behaviour change techniques, or which underpinning theories, are most useful for limiting GWG.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30056830

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Wed, 16 Oct 2013, 14:36:52 EST by Matthew Fuller-tyszkiewicz

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