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Re-mapping class and caste consciousness: short narratives of South Asian diaspora in Australia

Sarwal, Amit 2013, Re-mapping class and caste consciousness: short narratives of South Asian diaspora in Australia, in CCG Research Paper Series July 2013 : Re-mapping caste and class consciousness : Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation Research Paper Series Vol. 4, No. 2 July 2013, Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 3-18.

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Title Re-mapping class and caste consciousness: short narratives of South Asian diaspora in Australia
Author(s) Sarwal, Amit
Conference name Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation Lunchtime Seminar (2013 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 21 March 2013
Title of proceedings CCG Research Paper Series July 2013 : Re-mapping caste and class consciousness : Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation Research Paper Series Vol. 4, No. 2 July 2013
Editor(s) Mansouri, FethiORCID iD for Mansouri, Fethi orcid.org/0000-0002-8914-0485
Marotta, Vince
Publication date 2013
Conference series Citizenship and Globalisation Research Paper Series
Start page 3
End page 18
Total pages 15
Publisher Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) caste
class
short narratives
South Asian diaspora
Australia
Summary Thanks to Bollywood, a Non-Resident Indian (NRI) is predominantly imagined, back home in India, as super-rich, fully westernized in manners and doing India proud in foreign lands. One reason for this as explained by renowned Bollywood producer-director Late Yash Chopra, in his address at the first Pravasi Bharatiya Divas (Expatriate Indians Day) in 2003, is that as a director he is also working as a ‘historian’ and carrying on his shoulders the ‘moral responsibility [ … ] to depict India [and the Indian Diaspora] at its best’. In this regard, Ghassan Hage also notes that the ‘last thing’ the migrants (particularly men) would like to share with their families back home is shocking stories about racism, discrimination or prejudices that they may have experienced in public or the workplace. Such a revelation would obviously be followed by ‘why did you make us suffer and move to the end of the world just to get demeaned and insulted?’ Hage further notes that therefore the migrants’ familial and class experiences, be it in films, literature or even some sociological studies, are often ‘portrayed as a positive experience’ and this is ‘how the whole migratory enterprise continues to legitimise itself’'. It could be argued that this is one of the reasons the alleged ‘racist’ attacks against Indian students received so much attention in the Indian media. It was not just discrimination but the notion of discrimination and second class treatment (based on skin colour and origin) against the revered and much envied diasporic Indian that created such a media furor in India.
ISSN 1838-2126
1838-2118
Language eng
Field of Research 200211 Postcolonial Studies
200209 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies
209999 Language, Communication and Culture not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category EN Other conference paper
Copyright notice ©2013, Deakin University, Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation.
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057025

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
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Created: Mon, 21 Oct 2013, 13:24:57 EST by Amit Sarwal

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.