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Short-term intensified cycle training alters acute and chronic responses of PGC1α and cytochrome C oxidase IV to exercise in human skeletal muscle

Stepto, Nigel K., Benziane, Boubacar, Wadley, Glenn D., Chibalin, Alexander V., Canny, Benedict J., Eynon, Nir and McConell, Glenn K. 2012, Short-term intensified cycle training alters acute and chronic responses of PGC1α and cytochrome C oxidase IV to exercise in human skeletal muscle, PLOS ONE, vol. 7, no. 12, Article: e53080, pp. 1-11.

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Title Short-term intensified cycle training alters acute and chronic responses of PGC1α and cytochrome C oxidase IV to exercise in human skeletal muscle
Author(s) Stepto, Nigel K.
Benziane, Boubacar
Wadley, Glenn D.
Chibalin, Alexander V.
Canny, Benedict J.
Eynon, Nir
McConell, Glenn K.
Journal name PLOS ONE
Volume number 7
Issue number 12
Season Article: e53080
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Place of publication San Francisco, California
Publication date 2012-12
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) exercise responsive signalling pathways
exercise-induced mitochondrial adaptation
mitochondrial gene expression
protein abundance
acute exercise
post-training
Summary Reduced activation of exercise responsive signalling pathways have been reported in response to acute exercise after training; however little is known about the adaptive responses of the mitochondria. Accordingly, we investigated changes in mitochondrial gene expression and protein abundance in response to the same acute exercise before and after 10-d of intensive cycle training.

Nine untrained, healthy participants (mean±SD; VO2peak 44.1±17.6 ml/kg/min) performed a 60 min bout of cycling exercise at 164±18 W (72% of pre-training VO2peak). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle at rest, immediately and 3 h after exercise. The participants then underwent 10-d of cycle training which included four high-intensity interval training sessions (6×5 min; 90–100% VO2peak) and six prolonged moderate-intensity sessions (45–90 min; 75% VO2peak). Participants repeated the pre-training exercise trial at the same absolute work load (64% of pre-training VO2peak). Muscle PGC1-α mRNA expression was attenuated as it increased by 11- and 4- fold (P<0.001) after exercise pre- and post-training, respectively. PGC1-α protein expression increased 1.5 fold (P<0.05) in response to exercise pre-training with no further increases after the post-training exercise bout. RIP140 protein abundance was responsive to acute exercise only (P<0.01). COXIV mRNA (1.6 fold; P<0.01) and COXIV protein expression (1.5 fold; P<0.05) were increased by training but COXIV protein expression was decreased (20%; P<0.01) by acute exercise pre- and post-training.

These findings demonstrate that short-term intensified training promotes increased mitochondrial gene expression and protein abundance. Furthermore, acute indicators of exercise-induced mitochondrial adaptation appear to be blunted in response to exercise at the same absolute intensity following short-term training.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Public Library of Science (PLOS)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057055

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Tue, 22 Oct 2013, 08:11:50 EST by Glenn Wadley

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.