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Obesity prevention programs and policies: practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of feasibility and effectiveness

Cleland, Verity, McNeilly, Briohny, Crawford, David and Ball, Kylie 2013, Obesity prevention programs and policies: practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of feasibility and effectiveness, Obesity, vol. 21, no. 9, pp. 448-455.

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Title Obesity prevention programs and policies: practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of feasibility and effectiveness
Author(s) Cleland, Verity
McNeilly, Briohny
Crawford, David
Ball, Kylie
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 21
Issue number 9
Start page 448
End page 455
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2013-09
ISSN 1930-7381
1930-739X
Summary Objectives:
The aims of this study were to map obesity prevention activity being implemented by government, non-government, and community-based organizations; to determine practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of the feasibility and effectiveness of a range of evidence-based obesity prevention strategies; and to determine practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of preferred settings for obesity prevention strategies.

Design and Methods:
This study involved a cross-sectional survey of 304 public health practitioners and policy-makers from government, non-government, and community organizations across Victoria, Australia. Participants reported their organizations' current obesity prevention programs and policies, their own perceptions of the feasibility and effectiveness of strategies to prevent obesity and their preferred settings for obesity prevention.

Results:
Thirty-nine percent had an obesity prevention policy, and 92% were implementing obesity prevention programs. The most common programs focused on education, skill-building, and increasing access to healthy eating/physical activity opportunities. School curriculum-based initiatives, social support for physical activity, and family-based programs were considered the most effective strategies, whereas curriculum-based initiatives, active after-school programs, and providing access to and information about physical activity facilities were deemed the most feasible strategies. Schools were generally perceived as the most preferred setting for obesity prevention.

Conclusion:
Many organizations had obesity prevention programs, but far fewer had obesity prevention policies. Current strategies and those considered feasible and effective are often mismatched with the empirical literature. Systems to ensure better alignment between researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers, and identifying effective methods of translating empirical evidence into practice and policy are required.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057073

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.