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Associations between psychological stress, eating, physical activity, sedentary behaviours and body weight among women: a longitudinal study

Mouchacca, Jennifer, Abbott, Gavin R and Ball, Kylie 2013, Associations between psychological stress, eating, physical activity, sedentary behaviours and body weight among women: a longitudinal study, BMC public health, vol. 13, no. 1, Article 828, pp. 1-11.

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Title Associations between psychological stress, eating, physical activity, sedentary behaviours and body weight among women: a longitudinal study
Author(s) Mouchacca, Jennifer
Abbott, Gavin R
Ball, Kylie
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Season Article 828
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) body weight
eating
physical activity
psychological stress
regression analyses
sedentary behaviours
Summary Background
There is an increased risk of obesity amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged populations and emerging evidence suggests that psychological stress may be a key factor in this relationship. This paper reports the results of cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of relationships between perceived stress, weight and weight-related behaviours in a cohort of socioeconomically disadvantaged women.

Methods.
This study used baseline and follow-up self-report survey data from the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality study, comprising a cohort of 1382 women aged 18 to 46 years from 80 of the most socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Victoria, Australia. Women reported their height (baseline only), weight, sociodemographic characteristics, perceived stress, leisure-time physical activity, sedentary and dietary behaviours at baseline and three-year follow-up. Linear and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between stress (predictor) and weight, and weight-related behaviours.

Results:
Higher perceived stress in women was associated with a higher BMI, and to increased odds of being obese in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were found between stress and both less leisure-time physical activity, and more frequent fast food consumption. Longitudinal associations were also found between stress and increased television viewing time.

Conclusion:
The present study contributes to the literature related to the effects of stress on weight and weight-related behaviours. The findings suggest that higher stress levels could contribute to obesity risk in women. Further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms underlying these associations. However, interventions that incorporate stress management techniques might help to prevent rising obesity rates among socioeconomically disadvantaged women.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057076

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Created: Tue, 22 Oct 2013, 10:16:59 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.