Openly accessible

'Everybody has settled in so well': How migrants make connections and build social capital in Geelong

Jackson, Ruth, Jatrana, Santosh, Johnson, Louise, Kilpatrick, Sue and King, Tanya 2013, 'Everybody has settled in so well': How migrants make connections and build social capital in Geelong, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic..

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
jackson-everybodyhassettled-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.35MB 38

Title 'Everybody has settled in so well': How migrants make connections and build social capital in Geelong
Author(s) Jackson, Ruth
Jatrana, Santosh
Johnson, Louise
Kilpatrick, Sue
King, Tanya
Publication date 2013-08
Series Alfred Deakin Research Institute working paper series two
Issue number No. 42
Total pages 39
Publisher Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) manpower policy
labour policy
refugees
immigrants policy
foreign workers
Summary Australian and Victorian Government policies encourage settlement in regional areas for international migrants, refugees and internal migrants. Migrants to regional areas are diverse in terms of their area or country of origin, skills and occupation, family status and other demographic characteristics. The regional cities to which they migrate are also varied in terms of their community resources, social and cultural capital. The objective shared by all of these cities is for migrants to engage successfully with their new communities. Just how this occurs is the subject of debate and a lack of clarity. This therefore calls for a sound, theoretically informed understanding of how employers and community groups (formal and informal) can effectively assist migrants to make social connections in regional cities, and practical strategies which respond to these insights. The well-established social determinants of health tell us that the more socially included, connected and stable workforce and their families are, the better will be their physical and mental health and wellbeing.

People in Australia generally move to live near family and friends; for better access to work or work opportunities; or to live in an attractive neighbourhood. Policies and programs intended to assist with settlement tend to be short term and project based. Good practice in assisting migrants make social connections however is long term and embedded into the community. Workplaces and community groups that are already established, and groups that migrants or others tend to form naturally, are good examples of such best practice. Workplaces, local government, institutions such as schools, community spaces and other organisations can also assist in the settling in process and can complement formal and informal community groups, once a sound evidence base is established.

This is the second paper to emerge from a research project running over 2011-2012 at the Alfred Deakin Research Institute (ADRI), Deakin University in Geelong. The first Working Paper (No. 32) (Jackson et al., 2012) located the research theoretically. This second Working Paper will report on the research itself, its methods and outcomes as well as policy implications. The first section of this paper will briefly outline the project before considering those who have migrated to Geelong in the past two to five years: to investigate why they moved to Geelong; how they made connections and with whom; and, what was the value of those connections (Section 2). The third section of the paper examines how employers, non-government organisations (NGOs) and other facilitators effectively assist migrants to make social connections. The fourth and fifth sections look at the barriers to making connections but also those things – organisation and policies - that facilitated settling in. Section six summarises the findings and makes a series of policy recommendations for individuals, organisations and government on how to better the prospects for migrant in regional centres.
ISBN 9781921745416
ISSN 1837-7440
1837-7432
Language eng
Field of Research 160403 Social and Cultural Geography
160514 Urban Policy
160801 Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
HERDC Research category A6 Research report/technical paper
Copyright notice ©2013, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057084

Document type: Report
Collections: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 152 Abstract Views, 41 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 22 Oct 2013, 11:26:52 EST by Tanya King

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.