Crime toolkits : the productisation of cybercrime

Alazab, Ammar, Abawajy, Jemal, Hobbs, Michael, Layton, Robert and Khraisat, Ansam 2013, Crime toolkits : the productisation of cybercrime, in TrustCom 2013 : Proceedings of the 12th IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications, IEEE, Piscataway, N.J., pp. 1626-1632.

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Title Crime toolkits : the productisation of cybercrime
Author(s) Alazab, Ammar
Abawajy, Jemal
Hobbs, Michael
Layton, Robert
Khraisat, Ansam
Conference name Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications. IEEE International Conference (12th : 2013 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 16-18 Jul. 2013
Title of proceedings TrustCom 2013 : Proceedings of the 12th IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2013
Conference series IEEE International Conference on Trust, Security and Privacy in Computing and Communications
Start page 1626
End page 1632
Total pages 7
Publisher IEEE
Place of publication Piscataway, N.J.
Keyword(s) cybercrime
attack
styling
crime toolkits
Introduction
Summary The productisation of crime toolkits is happening at an ever-increasing rate. Previous attacks that required indepth knowledge of computer systems can now be purchased online. Large scale attacks previously requiring months to setup a botnet can now be scheduled for a small fee. Criminals are leveraging this opportunity of commercialization, by compromising web applications and user's browser, to gain advantages such as using the computer's resources for launching further attacks, or stealing data such as identifying information. Crime toolkits are being developed to attack an increasing number of applications and can now be deployed by attackers with little technical knowledge. This paper surveys the current trends in crime toolkits, with a case study on the Zeus botnet. We profile the types of exploits that malicious writers prefer, with a view to predicting future attack trends. We find that the scope for damage is increasing, particularly as specialisation and scale increase in cybercrime.
ISBN 9780769550220
Language eng
Field of Research 080303 Computer System Security
Socio Economic Objective 890299 Computer Software and Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2013, IEEE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057197

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Information Technology
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