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High genetic diversity is not essential for successful introduction

Rollins, Lee A., Moles, Angela T., Lam, Serena, Buitenwerf, Robert, Buswell, Joanna M., Brandenburger, Claire R., Flores-Moreno, Habacuc, Nielsen, Knud B., Couchman, Ellen, Brown, Gordon S., Thomson, Fiona J., Hemmings, Frank, Frankham, Richard and Sherwin, William B. 2013, High genetic diversity is not essential for successful introduction, Ecology and evolution, doi: 10.1002/ece3.824.

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Title High genetic diversity is not essential for successful introduction
Author(s) Rollins, Lee A.ORCID iD for Rollins, Lee A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Moles, Angela T.
Lam, Serena
Buitenwerf, Robert
Buswell, Joanna M.
Brandenburger, Claire R.
Flores-Moreno, Habacuc
Nielsen, Knud B.
Couchman, Ellen
Brown, Gordon S.
Thomson, Fiona J.
Hemmings, Frank
Frankham, Richard
Sherwin, William B.
Journal name Ecology and evolution
Total pages 17
Publisher John Wiley
Place of publication West Sussex, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2045-7758
Keyword(s) Asteraceae
biological invasions
Caryophyllaceae
genetic diversity
microsatellite
rapid evolution
Summary Some introduced populations thrive and evolve despite the presumed loss of diversity at introduction. We aimed to quantify the amount of genetic diversity retained at introduction in species that have shown evidence of adaptation to their introduced environments. Samples were taken from native and introduced ranges of Arctotheca populifolia and Petrorhagia nanteuilii. Using microsatellite data, we identified the source for each introduction, estimated genetic diversity in native and introduced populations and calculated the amount of diversity retained in introduced populations. These values were compared to those from a literature review of diversity in native, confamilial populations and to estimates of genetic diversity retained at introduction. Gene diversity in the native range of both species was significantly lower than for confamilials. We found that, on average, introduced populations showing evidence of adaptation to their new environments retained 81% of the genetic diversity from the native range. Introduced populations of P. nanteuilii had higher genetic diversity than found in the native source populations, whereas introduced populations of A. populifolia retained only 14% of its native diversity in one introduction and 1% in another. Our literature review has shown that most introductions demonstrating adaptive ability have lost diversity upon introduction. The two species studied here had exceptionally low native range genetic diversity. Further, the two introductions of A. populifolia represent the largest percentage loss of genetic diversity in a species showing evidence of substantial morphological change in the introduced range. While high genetic diversity may increase the likelihood of invasion success, the species examined here adapted to their new environments with very little neutral genetic diversity. This finding suggests that even introductions founded by small numbers of individuals have the potential to become invasive.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/ece3.824
Field of Research 050103 Invasive Species Ecology
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, John Wiley & Sons
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057245

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Created: Thu, 24 Oct 2013, 06:18:30 EST by Lee Rollins

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.