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Surveillance technology and territorial controls: governance and the ‘lite touch’ of privacy

Palmer, Darren and Warren, Ian 2013, Surveillance technology and territorial controls: governance and the ‘lite touch’ of privacy, Novatica: revista de la Asociacion de Tecnicos de Informatica, Special English Edition, pp. 26-31.

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Title Surveillance technology and territorial controls: governance and the ‘lite touch’ of privacy
Author(s) Palmer, Darren
Warren, Ian
Journal name Novatica: revista de la Asociacion de Tecnicos de Informatica
Season Special English Edition
Start page 26
End page 31
Total pages 6
Publisher Asociacion de Tecnicos de Informatica
Place of publication Madrid, Spain
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0211-2124
Keyword(s) alcohol
antisocial Behaviour
crime prevention
economy
ID scanners
night-time
privacy
Notes The considerable growth of surveillance technologies, dataveillance and digital information processing has occurred across many domains, including the night-time economy. We explore a particular technology (ID scanners) and the connections between this form of surveillance and associated database construction with the broader use of new forms of territorial governance. In turn, we argue that privacy, at least in the context of Australia, has limited influence on the use of new and untested surveillance technologies in contemporary law enforcement. In part, this is due to the construction of current Australian privacy laws and oversight principles. We argue this in itself does not solely account for the limitations of privacy regimes, as recent Canadian research demonstrates how privacy regulation generates limited control over the expansion of new crime prevention technologies. However, a more telling problem involves the enactment of new laws allowing police and venue operators to exclude the undesirable from venues, streets and entertainment zones. These developments reflect the broader shift to governing through sub-sovereign territorial controls that seek to leverage many current and emerging surveillance technologies and their normalisation in preventing crime without being encumbered by the niceties of privacy law.
Language eng
Field of Research 160201 Causes and Prevention of Crime
160206 Private Policing and Security Services
180114 Human Rights Law
Socio Economic Objective 940402 Crime Prevention
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Asociacion de Tecnicos de Informatica
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057301

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Created: Fri, 25 Oct 2013, 19:37:26 EST by Ian Warren

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.