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Knowledge translation strategies to improve the use of evidence in public health decision making in local government: intervention design and implementation plan

Armstrong, Rebecca, Waters, Elizabeth, Dobbins, Maureen, Anderson, Laurie, Moore, Laurence, Petticrew, Mark, Clark, Rachel, Pettman, Tahna, Burns, Catherine, Moodie, Marjorie, Conning, Rebecca and Swinburn, Boyd 2013, Knowledge translation strategies to improve the use of evidence in public health decision making in local government: intervention design and implementation plan, Implementation science, vol. 8, no. 1, Article 121, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/1748-5908-8-121.

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Title Knowledge translation strategies to improve the use of evidence in public health decision making in local government: intervention design and implementation plan
Author(s) Armstrong, Rebecca
Waters, Elizabeth
Dobbins, Maureen
Anderson, Laurie
Moore, Laurence
Petticrew, Mark
Clark, Rachel
Pettman, Tahna
Burns, Catherine
Moodie, Marjorie
Conning, Rebecca
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Implementation science
Volume number 8
Issue number 1
Season Article 121
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-10-09
ISSN 1748-5908
Keyword(s) decision-making
evidence
knowledge translation
public health
Summary Background: 
Knowledge translation strategies are an approach to increase the use of evidence within policy and practice decision-making contexts. In clinical and health service contexts, knowledge translation strategies have focused on individual behavior change, however the multi-system context of public health requires a multi-level, multi-strategy approach. This paper describes the design of and implementation plan for a knowledge translation intervention for public health decision making in local government.

Methods:
Four preliminary research studies contributed findings to the design of the intervention: a systematic review of knowledge translation intervention effectiveness research, a scoping study of knowledge translation perspectives and relevant theory literature, a survey of the local government public health workforce, and a study of the use of evidence-informed decision-making for public health in local government. A logic model was then developed to represent the putative pathways between intervention inputs, processes, and outcomes operating between individual-, organizational-, and system-level strategies. This formed the basis of the intervention plan.

Results:
The systematic and scoping reviews identified that effective and promising strategies to increase access to research evidence require an integrated intervention of skill development, access to a knowledge broker, resources and tools for evidence-informed decision making, and networking for information sharing. Interviews and survey analysis suggested that the intervention needs to operate at individual and organizational levels, comprising workforce development, access to evidence, and regular contact with a knowledge broker to increase access to intervention evidence; develop skills in appraisal and integration of evidence; strengthen networks; and explore organizational factors to build organizational cultures receptive to embedding evidence in practice. The logic model incorporated these inputs and strategies with a set of outcomes to measure the intervention's effectiveness based on the theoretical frameworks, evaluation studies, and decision-maker experiences.

Conclusion:
Documenting the design of and implementation plan for this knowledge translation intervention provides a transparent, theoretical, and practical approach to a complex intervention. It provides significant insights into how practitioners might engage with evidence in public health decision making. While this intervention model was designed for the local government context, it is likely to be applicable and generalizable across sectors and settings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-8-121
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057523

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Created: Thu, 07 Nov 2013, 14:17:49 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.