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Sizing the association between lifestyle behaviours and fatness in a large, heterogeneous sample of youth of multiple ethnicities from 4 countries

Sluyter, John D., Scragg, Robert K. R., Plank, Lindsay D., Waqa, Gade, Fotu, Kalesita F. and Swinburn, Boyd A. 2013, Sizing the association between lifestyle behaviours and fatness in a large, heterogeneous sample of youth of multiple ethnicities from 4 countries, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 10, no. 115, pp. 1-14.

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Title Sizing the association between lifestyle behaviours and fatness in a large, heterogeneous sample of youth of multiple ethnicities from 4 countries
Author(s) Sluyter, John D.
Scragg, Robert K. R.
Plank, Lindsay D.
Waqa, Gade
Fotu, Kalesita F.
Swinburn, Boyd A.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 10
Issue number 115
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-10-12
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) television
soft drink
breakfast
physical activity
obesity
meta-analysis
Summary Background: 
The magnitude of the relationship between lifestyle risk factors for obesity and adiposity is not clear. The aim of this study was to clarify this in order to determine the level of importance of lifestyle factors in obesity aetiology.

Methods:
A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on data on youth who were not trying to change weight (n = 5714), aged 12 to 22 years and from 8 ethnic groups living in New Zealand, Australia, Fiji and Tonga. Demographic and lifestyle data were measured by questionnaires. Fatness was measured by body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score and bioimpedance analysis, which was used to estimate percent body fat and total fat mass (TFM). Associations between lifestyle and body composition variables were examined using linear regression and forest plots.

Results:
TV watching was positively related to fatness in a dose-dependent manner. Strong, dose-dependent associations were observed between fatness and soft drink consumption (positive relationship), breakfast consumption (inverse relationship) and after-school physical activity (inverse relationship). Breakfast consumption-fatness associations varied in size across ethnic groups. Lifestyle risk factors for obesity were associated with percentage differences in body composition variables that were greatest for TFM and smallest for BMI.

Conclusions:
Lifestyle factors were most strongly related to TFM, which suggests that studies that use BMI alone to quantify fatness underestimate the full effect of lifestyle on adiposity. This study clarifies the size of lifestyle-fatness relationships observed in previous studies.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057526

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: WHO Collaborating Centre on Obesity Prevention
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.