You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Skeletal lesions in human tuberculosis may sometimes heal: an aid to palaeopathological diagnoses

Holloway, Kara L., Link, Karl, Ruhli, Frank and Henneberg, Maciej 2013, Skeletal lesions in human tuberculosis may sometimes heal: an aid to palaeopathological diagnoses, PLOS one, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0062798.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
holloway-skeletallesions-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 3.86MB 4

Title Skeletal lesions in human tuberculosis may sometimes heal: an aid to palaeopathological diagnoses
Author(s) Holloway, Kara L.
Link, Karl
Ruhli, Frank
Henneberg, Maciej
Journal name PLOS one
Volume number 8
Issue number 4
Article ID e62798
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013-04-24
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) tuberculosis
skeletal lesions
vertebrae
palaeopathological diagnoses
Summary In three to five percent of active cases of tuberculosis, skeletal lesions develop. Typically, these occur on the vertebrae and are destructive in nature. In this paper, we examined cases of skeletal tuberculosis from a skeletal collection (Galler Collection) with focus on the manifestation of bony changes due to tuberculosis in various body regions in association with antibiotic introduction. This skeletal collection was created in 1925–1977 by a pathologist at the University Hospital in Zürich, Ernst Galler. It includes the remains of 2426 individuals with documented clinical histories as well as autopsies. It contained 29 cases of skeletal tuberculosis lesions. We observed natural healing of vertebral lesions through several processes including fusion of vertebrae, bone deposition and fusion of posterior elements. In these cases, we observed a higher frequency and proportion of bone deposition and fusion of posterior vertebral elements where pharmacological agents were used. There were also four cases of artificial healing through surgically induced posterior spinal fusion. With the introduction of pharmaceutical treatments, the number of individuals with multiple tuberculous foci decreased from 80% to 25% when compared to individuals who did not receive any drug therapy. Investigation of comorbidities showed that pneumonia, pleuritis and being underweight were consistently present, even with pharmaceutical treatment. Our results have applications in palaeopathological diagnoses where healing and consequent bone deposition may complicate differential diagnoses.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0062798
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920404 Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057942

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 181 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 19 Nov 2013, 11:36:21 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.