Sentencing in Australia

Bagaric, Mirko and Edney, Richard 2013, Sentencing in Australia, Revised ed., Thomson Reuters, Sydney, NSW.

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Title Sentencing in Australia
Author(s) Bagaric, Mirko
Edney, Richard
Publication date 2013
Total pages 640
Publisher Thomson Reuters
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW
Keyword(s) the totality principle
incapacitation
prior convictions
the parity principle
harsh prison conditions
sentencing ranges
indigenous offenders
Summary Sentencing in Australia provides an up-to-date explanation of sentencing law and practice in all nine Australian jurisdictions.

Sentencing is the area of law which consumes most court of appeal work and this title satisfies the need for a thorough and coherent treatment of this complex subject, which involves a wide range of complex and interacting factors.

In this new work, lawyer and academic Mirko Bagaric and barrister Richard Edney consider the law across Australia. They examine existing practice and provide extensive analysis of the objectives of sentencing, in the form of incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilitation and proportionality.

The work systematically and comprehensively covers key mitigating and aggravating factors and the considerations which strongly influence sentencing determinations.
ISBN 9780455232409
9780455232416
Edition Revised
Language eng
Field of Research 180110 Criminal Law and Procedure
Socio Economic Objective 940405 Law Reform
HERDC Research category A3 Revision/new edition
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30057987

Document type: Book
Collection: School of Law
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