You are not logged in.

A review of the adaptive significance and ecosystem consequences of zooplankton diel vertical migrations

Hays, Graeme C. 2003, A review of the adaptive significance and ecosystem consequences of zooplankton diel vertical migrations, Hydrobiologia, vol. 503, no. 1-3, pp. 163-170, doi: 10.1023/B:HYDR.0000008476.23617.b0.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title A review of the adaptive significance and ecosystem consequences of zooplankton diel vertical migrations
Author(s) Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Hydrobiologia
Volume number 503
Issue number 1-3
Start page 163
End page 170
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2003-08-01
ISSN 0018-8158
1573-5117
Summary Diel vertical migration (DVM) by zooplankton is a universal feature in all the World's oceans, as well as being common in freshwater environments. The normal pattern involves movement from shallow depths at night to greater depths during the day. For many herbivorous and omnivorous mesozooplankton that feed predominantly near the surface on phytoplankton and microzooplankton, minimising the risk of predation from fish seems to be the ultimate factor behind DVM. These migrants appear to use deep water as a dark daytime refuge where their probability of being detected and eaten is lower than if they remained near the surface. Associated with these vertical movements of mesozooplankton, predators at higher trophic levels, including invertebrates, fish, marine mammals, birds and reptiles, may modify their behaviour to optimise the exploitation of their vertically migrating prey. Recent advances in biotelemetry promise to allow the interaction between migrating zooplankton and diving air-breathing vertebrates to be explored in far more detail than hitherto.
Language eng
DOI 10.1023/B:HYDR.0000008476.23617.b0
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058228

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 272 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 198 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 25 Nov 2013, 13:32:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.