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Movement patterns of green turtles in Brazilian coastal waters described by satellite tracking and flipper tagging

Godley, B.J., Lima, E.H.S.M., Akesson, S., Broderick, A.C., Glen, F., Godfrey, M.H., Luschi, P. and Hays, G.C. 2003, Movement patterns of green turtles in Brazilian coastal waters described by satellite tracking and flipper tagging, Marine ecology progress series, vol. 253, pp. 279-288.

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Title Movement patterns of green turtles in Brazilian coastal waters described by satellite tracking and flipper tagging
Author(s) Godley, B.J.
Lima, E.H.S.M.
Akesson, S.
Broderick, A.C.
Glen, F.
Godfrey, M.H.
Luschi, P.
Hays, G.C.ORCID iD for Hays, G.C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Marine ecology progress series
Volume number 253
Start page 279
End page 288
Total pages 10
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2003
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Keyword(s) marine turtle
Chelonia mydas
migration
feeding
mark-recapture
home range
incidental catch
Summary The movements of 8 green turtles Chelonia mydas in Brazilian coastal waters were tracked using transmitters linked to the Argos system for periods of between 1 and 197 d. These were the first tracking data gathered on juveniles of this species in this important foraging ground. Information was integrated with that collected over a decade using traditional flipper-tagging methods at the same site. Both satellite telemetry and flipper tagging suggested that turtles undertook 1 of 3 general patterns of behaviour: pronounced long range movements (>100 km), moderate range movements (<100 km) or extended residence very close to the capture/release site. There seemed to be a general tendency for the turtles recaptured/tracked further afield to have been among the larger turtles captured. Satellite tracking of 5 turtles which moved from the release site showed that they moved through coastal waters; a factor which is likely to predispose migrating turtles to incidental capture as a result of the prevailing fishing methods in the region. The movements of the 3 turtles who travelled less than 100 km from the release site challenge previous ideas relating to home range in green turtles feeding in sea grass pastures. We hypothesise that there may be a fundamental difference in the pattern of habitat utilisation by larger green turtles depending on whether they are feeding on seagrass or macroalgae. Extended tracking of 2 small turtles which stayed near the release point showed that small juvenile turtles, whilst in residence in a particular feeding ground, can also exhibit high levels of site-fidelity with home ranges of the order of several square kilometers.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Inter-Research
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058230

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.