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Two hundred years after a commercial marine turtle fishery: the current status of marine turtles nesting in the Cayman Islands

Aiken, Jonathan J., Godley, Brendan J., Broderick, Annette C., Austin, Timothy, Ebanks-Petrie, Gina and Hays, Graeme C. 2001, Two hundred years after a commercial marine turtle fishery: the current status of marine turtles nesting in the Cayman Islands, Oryx, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 145-151, doi: 10.1046/j.1365-3008.2001.00168.x.

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Title Two hundred years after a commercial marine turtle fishery: the current status of marine turtles nesting in the Cayman Islands
Author(s) Aiken, Jonathan J.
Godley, Brendan J.
Broderick, Annette C.
Austin, Timothy
Ebanks-Petrie, Gina
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Oryx
Volume number 35
Issue number 2
Start page 145
End page 151
Total pages 7
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2001-04
ISSN 0030-6053
Keyword(s) commercial fishery
conservation
marine turtles
monitoring
recolonization
Summary Large populations of marine turtles breeding in the Cayman Islands were drastically reduced in the early 1800s. However, marine turtle nesting still occurs in the islands. The present-day status of this nesting population provides insight into the conservation of marine turtles, a long-lived species. In 1998 and 1999, the first systematic survey of marine turtle nesting in the Cayman Islands found 38 nests on 22 beaches scattered through the three islands. Three species were found: the green Chelonia mydas, hawksbill Eretmochelys imbricata and loggerhead Caretta caretta turtles. Comparison with other rookeries suggests that the small number of sexually mature adults surviving Cayman’s huge perturbations may be impeding population recovery. This shows the need to implement conservation measures prior to massive reductions in population size.
Language eng
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-3008.2001.00168.x
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058254

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.