You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles : history, review of epidemiology, and future implications

Hinder, Stephanie L., Hays, Graeme C., Brooks, Caroline J., Davies, Angharad P., Edwards, Martin, Walne, Anthony W. and Gravenor, Mike B. 2011, Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles : history, review of epidemiology, and future implications, Environmental health, vol. 10, no. 54, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/1476-069X-10-54.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hays-toxicmarine-2011.pdf Published version application/pdf 516.97KB 55

Title Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles : history, review of epidemiology, and future implications
Author(s) Hinder, Stephanie L.
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Brooks, Caroline J.
Davies, Angharad P.
Edwards, Martin
Walne, Anthony W.
Gravenor, Mike B.
Journal name Environmental health
Volume number 10
Issue number 54
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1476-069X
Summary The relationship between toxic marine microalgae species and climate change has become a high profile and well discussed topic in recent years, with research focusing on the possible future impacts of changing hydrological conditions on Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) species around the world. However, there is very little literature concerning the epidemiology of these species on marine organisms and human health. Here, we examine the current state of toxic microalgae species around the UK, in two ways: first we describe the key toxic syndromes and gather together the disparate reported data on their epidemiology from UK records and monitoring procedures. Secondly, using NHS hospital admissions and GP records from Wales, we attempt to quantify the incidence of shellfish poisoning from an independent source. We show that within the UK, outbreaks of shellfish poisoning are rare but occurring on a yearly basis in different regions and affecting a diverse range of molluscan shellfish and other marine organisms. We also show that the abundance of a species does not necessarily correlate to the rate of toxic events. Based on routine hospital records, the numbers of shellfish poisonings in the UK are very low, but the identification of the toxin involved, or even a confirmation of a poisoning event is extremely difficult to diagnose. An effective shellfish monitoring system, which shuts down aquaculture sites when toxins exceed regularity limits, has clearly prevented serious impact to human health, and remains the only viable means of monitoring the potential threat to human health. However, the closure of these sites has an adverse economic impact, and the monitoring system does not include all toxic plankton. The possible geographic spreading of toxic microalgae species is therefore a concern, as warmer waters in the Atlantic could suit several species with southern biogeographical affinities enabling them to occupy the coastal regions of the UK, but which are not yet monitored or considered to be detrimental.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1476-069X-10-54
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058300

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 26 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 162 Abstract Views, 55 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 25 Nov 2013, 13:42:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.