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Distribution, extent of inter-annual variability and diet of the bloom-forming jellyfish Rhizostoma in European waters

Lilley, M.K.S., Houghton, J.D.R. and Hays, G.C. 2009, Distribution, extent of inter-annual variability and diet of the bloom-forming jellyfish Rhizostoma in European waters, Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 39-48, doi: 10.1017/S0025315408002439.

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Title Distribution, extent of inter-annual variability and diet of the bloom-forming jellyfish Rhizostoma in European waters
Author(s) Lilley, M.K.S.
Houghton, J.D.R.
Hays, G.C.ORCID iD for Hays, G.C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
Volume number 89
Issue number 1
Start page 39
End page 48
Total pages 10
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0025-3154
1469-7769
Keyword(s) historical distributions
gelatinous zooplankton
aggregation
ecosystem shift
Mar Menor
Rhysostoma
Rhisostoma
Rhyzostoma
Summary Jellyfish (Cnidaria: Scyphozoa) are increasingly thought to play a number of important ecosystem roles, but often fundamental knowledge of their distribution, seasonality and inter-annual variability is lacking. Bloom forming species, due to their high densities, can have particularly intense trophic and socio-economic impacts. In northern Europe it is known that one particularly large (up to 30 kg wet weight) bloom forming jellyfish is Rhizostoma spp. Given the potential importance, we set out to review all known records from peer-reviewed and broader public literature of the jellyfish R. octopus (Linnaeus) and R. pulmo (Macri) (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomae) across western Europe. These data revealed distinct hotspots where regular Rhizostoma spp. aggregations appeared to form, with other sites characterized by occasional abundances and a widespread distribution of infrequent observations. Surveys of known R. octopus hotspots around the Irish Sea also revealed marked inter-annual variation with particularly high abundances forming during 2003. The location of such consistent aggregations and inter-annual variances are discussed in relation to physical, climatic and dietary variations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0025315408002439
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058328

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.