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Indicators of the impact of climate change on migratory species

Newson, Stuart E., Mendes, Sonia, Crick, Humphrey Q.P., Dulvy, Nicholas K., Houghton, Jon D.R., Hays, Graeme C., Hutson, Anthony M., Macleod, Colin D., Pierce, Graham J. and Robinson, Robert A. 2009, Indicators of the impact of climate change on migratory species, Endangered species research, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 101-113, doi: 10.3354/esr00162.

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Title Indicators of the impact of climate change on migratory species
Author(s) Newson, Stuart E.
Mendes, Sonia
Crick, Humphrey Q.P.
Dulvy, Nicholas K.
Houghton, Jon D.R.
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Hutson, Anthony M.
Macleod, Colin D.
Pierce, Graham J.
Robinson, Robert A.
Journal name Endangered species research
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 101
End page 113
Total pages 13
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1863-5407
1613-4796
Keyword(s) conservation
management
birds
fish
mammals
turtles
bats
climate change
migration
Summary The Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals adopted a Resolution in 2005 recognising the impacts of climate change on migratory species. It called on Contracting Parties to undertake more research to improve our understanding of these impacts and to implement adaptation measures to reduce foreseeable adverse effects. Given the large diversity of taxa and species affected by climate change, it is impossible to monitor all species and effects thereof. However, it is likely that many of the key ecological and physical processes through which climate change may impact wildlife could be monitored using a suite of indicators, each comprising parameters of species/populations or groups of species as proxies for wider assemblages, habitats and ecosystems. Herein, we identify a suite of 17 indicators whose attributes could reveal negative impacts of climate change on the global status of migratory species: 4 for birds, 4 for marine mammals, 2 for sea turtles, 1 for fish, 3 for land mammals and 3 for bats. A few of these indicators would be relatively straightforward to develop, but most would require additional data collation, and in many cases methodological development. Choosing and developing indicators of the impacts of climate change on migratory species is a challenge, particularly with endangered species, which are subject to many other pressures. To identify and implement conservation measures for these species, indicators must account for the full ensemble of pressures, and link to a system of alerts and triggers for action.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/esr00162
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Inter-Research
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058329

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.