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Travelling through a warming world: climate change and migratory species

Robinson, Robert A., Crick, Humphrey Q.P., Learmonth, Jennifer A., Maclean, Ilya M.D., Thomas, Chris D., Bairlein, Franz, Forchhammer, Mads C., Francis, Charles M., Gill, Jennifer A., Godley, Brendan J., Harwood, John, Hays, Graeme C., Huntley, Brian, Hutson, Anthony M., Pierce, Graham J., Rehfisch, Mark M., Sims, David W., Santos, M. Begoña, Sparks, Timothy H., Stroud, David A. and Visser, Marcel E. 2009, Travelling through a warming world: climate change and migratory species, Endangered species research, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 87-99, doi: 10.3354/esr00095.

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Title Travelling through a warming world: climate change and migratory species
Author(s) Robinson, Robert A.
Crick, Humphrey Q.P.
Learmonth, Jennifer A.
Maclean, Ilya M.D.
Thomas, Chris D.
Bairlein, Franz
Forchhammer, Mads C.
Francis, Charles M.
Gill, Jennifer A.
Godley, Brendan J.
Harwood, John
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Huntley, Brian
Hutson, Anthony M.
Pierce, Graham J.
Rehfisch, Mark M.
Sims, David W.
Santos, M. Begoña
Sparks, Timothy H.
Stroud, David A.
Visser, Marcel E.
Journal name Endangered species research
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 87
End page 99
Total pages 13
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1863-5407
1613-4796
Keyword(s) birds
marine mammals
turtles
fish
phenology
population change
conservation
Summary Long-distance migrations are among the wonders of the natural world, but this multi-taxon review shows that the characteristics of species that undertake such movements appear to make them particularly vulnerable to detrimental impacts of climate change. Migrants are key components of biological systems in high latitude regions, where the speed and magnitude of climate change impacts are greatest. They also rely on highly productive seasonal habitats, including wetlands and ocean upwellings that, with climate change, may become less food-rich and predictable in space and time. While migrants are adapted to adjust their behaviour with annual changes in the weather, the decoupling of climatic variables between geographically separate breeding and non-breeding grounds is beginning to result in mistimed migration. Furthermore, human land-use and activity patterns will constrain the ability of many species to modify their migratory routes and may increase the stress induced by climate change. Adapting conservation strategies for migrants in the light of climate change will require substantial shifts in site designation policies, flexibility of management strategies and the integration of forward planning for both people and wildlife. While adaptation to changes may be feasible for some terrestrial systems, wildlife in the marine ecosystem may be more dependent on the degree of climate change mitigation that is achievable.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/esr00095
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Inter-Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058331

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.