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Meta-analysis of movements in Atlantic leatherback turtles during the nesting season : conservation implications

Georges, Jean-Yves, Fossette, Sabrina, Billes, Alexis, Ferraroli, Sandra, Fretey, Jacques, Grémillet, David, Le, Maho Yvon, Myers, Andrews E., Tanaka, Hideji and Hays, Graeme C. 2007, Meta-analysis of movements in Atlantic leatherback turtles during the nesting season : conservation implications, Endangered species research, vol. 338, pp. 225-232, doi: 10.3354/meps338225.

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Title Meta-analysis of movements in Atlantic leatherback turtles during the nesting season : conservation implications
Author(s) Georges, Jean-Yves
Fossette, Sabrina
Billes, Alexis
Ferraroli, Sandra
Fretey, Jacques
Grémillet, David
Le, Maho Yvon
Myers, Andrews E.
Tanaka, Hideji
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Endangered species research
Volume number 338
Start page 225
End page 232
Total pages 8
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2007-05-24
ISSN 1863-5407
1613-4796
Keyword(s) at-sea movements
Atlantic Ocean
by-catch
coastal fisheries
conservation
Dermochelys coriacea
endangered species
Leatherback turtle
nesting season
site fidelity
Summary Despite decades of conservation efforts on the nesting beaches, the critical status of leatherback turtles shows that their survival predominantly depends on our ability to reduce at-sea mortality. Although areas where leatherbacks meet fisheries have been identified during the long distance movements between 2 consecutive nesting seasons, hot-spots of lethal interactions are still poorly defined within the nesting season, when individuals concentrate close to land. Here we report movements of satellite-tracked gravid leatherback turtles during the nesting season in Western Central Africa, South America and the Caribbean Sea, which account for about 70% of the world population. We show that during and at the end of the nesting season, leatherback turtles have the propensity to remain over the continental shelf, yet sometimes perform extended movements and may even nest in neighbouring countries. Leatherbacks exploit coastal commercial fishing grounds and face substantial accidental capture by regional coastal fisheries (e.g. at least 10% in French Guiana). This emphasises the need for regional conservation strategies to be developed at the ocean scale—both at sea and on land—to ensure the survival of the last leatherback turtles.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/meps338225
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Inter-Research
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058354

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.