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Developing a simple, rapid method for identifying and monitoring jellyfish aggregations from the air

Houghton, Jonathan D.R., Doyle, Thomas K., Davenport, John and Hays, Graeme C. 2006, Developing a simple, rapid method for identifying and monitoring jellyfish aggregations from the air, Marine ecology progress series, vol. 314, pp. 159-170, doi: 10.3354/meps314159.

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Title Developing a simple, rapid method for identifying and monitoring jellyfish aggregations from the air
Author(s) Houghton, Jonathan D.R.
Doyle, Thomas K.
Davenport, John
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Marine ecology progress series
Volume number 314
Start page 159
End page 170
Total pages 12
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Keyword(s) aerial surveys
Gelatinous zooplankton
jellyfish blooms
Scyphozoan
Rhizostoma octopus
Irish Sea
Summary Within the marine environment, aerial surveys have historically centred on apex predators, such as pinnipeds, cetaceans and sea birds. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the utility of this technique may also extend to subsurface species such as pre-spawning fish stocks and aggregations of jellyfish that occur close to the surface. In light of this, we tested the utility of aerial surveys to provide baseline data for 3 poorly understood scyphozoan jellyfish found throughout British and Irish waters: Rhizostoma octopus, Cyanea capillata and Chrysaora hysoscella. Our principal objectives were to develop a simple sampling protocol to identify and quantify surface aggregations, assess their consistency in space and time, and consider the overall applicability of this technique to the study of gelatinous zooplankton. This approach provided a general understanding of range and relative abundance for each target species, with greatest suitability to the study of R. octopus. For this species it was possible to identify and monitor extensive, temporally consistent and previously undocumented aggregations throughout the Irish Sea, an area spanning thousands of square kilometres. This finding has pronounced implications for ecologists and fisheries managers alike and, moreover, draws attention to the broad utility of aerial surveys for the study of gelatinous aggregations beyond the range of conventional ship-based techniques.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/meps314159
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Inter-Research
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058377

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.