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A review of migratory behaviour of sea turtles off southeastern Africa

Luschi, P., Lutjeharms, J.R.E., Lambardi, P., Mencacci, R., Hughes, G.R. and Hays, G.C. 2006, A review of migratory behaviour of sea turtles off southeastern Africa, South Africa journal of science, vol. 102, no. 1-2, January-February, pp. 51-58.

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Title A review of migratory behaviour of sea turtles off southeastern Africa
Author(s) Luschi, P.
Lutjeharms, J.R.E.
Lambardi, P.
Mencacci, R.
Hughes, G.R.
Hays, G.C.ORCID iD for Hays, G.C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name South Africa journal of science
Volume number 102
Issue number 1-2
Season January-February
Start page 51
End page 58
Total pages 8
Publisher South African Association for the Advancement of Science
Place of publication Marshalltown, Transvaal
Publication date 2006-01
ISSN 0038-2353
Summary The survival of sea turtles is threatened by modern fishing methods, exploitation of eggs and habitat destruction. Forming keystone species in the ocean, their extinction would disrupt the marine food chain in ways as yet unknown. The Indian Ocean has many breeding areas for sea turtles, the southernmost ones being on the Maputaland coast of KwaZulu-Natal, where loggerhead and leatherback turtles nest in large numbers thanks to long-lasting protection programmes. For the leatherback this is the only known nesting site in the entire western Indian Ocean. At the end of the reproductive season, both loggerheads and leatherbacks undertake migrations towards disparate feeding areas. To contribute to their conservation, the migratory behaviour of these animals needs to be understood. Here we review 10 years studying this behaviour using transmitters that telemeter data via satellite. It emerges that these species frequent widely dispersed areas ranging from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mozambique Channel. The migratory behaviour of leatherback and loggerhead turtles is, however, very different, probably due to their differing food requirements. While loggerhead postnesting movements have a truly migratory nature, the large-scale wanderings of leatherbacks are better described as prolonged sojourns in extended feeding areas.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, South African Association for the Advancement of Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058383

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.