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Animal-borne sensors successfully capture the real-time thermal properties of ocean basins

McMahon, Clive R., Autret, Emmanuelle, Houghton, Jonathan D.R., Lovell, Phil, Myers, Andrew E. and Hays, Graeme C. 2005, Animal-borne sensors successfully capture the real-time thermal properties of ocean basins, Limnology and oceanography : methods, vol. 3, pp. 392-398.

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Title Animal-borne sensors successfully capture the real-time thermal properties of ocean basins
Author(s) McMahon, Clive R.
Autret, Emmanuelle
Houghton, Jonathan D.R.
Lovell, Phil
Myers, Andrew E.
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Limnology and oceanography : methods
Volume number 3
Start page 392
End page 398
Total pages 7
Publisher American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Place of publication Waco, Tex.
Publication date 2005-09
ISSN 0024-3590
1541-5856
Summary Climate change is perhaps the most pressing and urgent environmental issue facing the world today. However our ability to predict and quantify the consequences of this change is severely limited by the paucity of in situ oceanographic measurements. Marine animals equipped with sophisticated oceanographic data loggers to study their behavior offer one solution to this problem because marine animals range widely across the world’s ocean basins and visit remote and often inaccessible locations. However, unlike the information being collected from conventional oceanographic sensing equipment, which has been validated, the data collected from instruments deployed on marine animals over long periods has not. This is the first long-term study to validate in situ oceanographic data collected by animal oceanographers. We compared the ocean temperatures collected by leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Atlantic Ocean with the ARGO network of ocean floats and could find no systematic errors that could be ascribed to sensor instability. Animal-borne sensors allowed water temperature to be monitored across a range of depths, over entire ocean basins, and, importantly, over long periods and so will play a key role in assessing global climate change through improved monitoring of global temperatures. This finding is especially pertinent given recent international calls for the development and implementation of a comprehensive Earth observation system (see http://iwgeo.ssc.nasa.gov/documents.asp?s=review) that includes the use of novel techniques for monitoring and understanding ocean and climate interactions to address strategic environmental and societal needs.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058384

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.