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Flexible foraging movements of Leatherback turtles across the North Atlantic Ocean

Hays, Graeme C., Hobson, Victoria J., Metcalfe, Julian D., Righton, David and Sims, David W. 2006, Flexible foraging movements of Leatherback turtles across the North Atlantic Ocean, Ecology, vol. 87, no. 10, pp. 2647-2656, doi: 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[2647:FFMOLT]2.0.CO;2.

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Title Flexible foraging movements of Leatherback turtles across the North Atlantic Ocean
Author(s) Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Hobson, Victoria J.
Metcalfe, Julian D.
Righton, David
Sims, David W.
Journal name Ecology
Volume number 87
Issue number 10
Start page 2647
End page 2656
Total pages 10
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Place of publication Ithaca, N.Y.
Publication date 2006-10
ISSN 0012-9658
1939-9170
Keyword(s) ARGOS
diel vertical migration
dive
jellyfish
leatherback turtle
levy flight
migration
movement rules
penguin
satellite tracking
seal
whale
Summary Some marine species have been shown to target foraging at particular hotspots of high prey abundance. However, we show here that in the year after a nesting season, female leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Atlantic generally spend relatively little time in fixed hotspots, especially those with a surface signature revealed in satellite imagery, but rather tend to have a pattern of near continuous traveling. Associated with this traveling, distinct changes in dive behavior indicate that turtles constantly fine tune their foraging behavior and diel activity patterns in association with local conditions. Switches between nocturnal vs. diurnal activity are rare in the animal kingdom but may be essential for survival on a diet of gelatinous zooplankton where patches of high prey availability are rare. These results indicate that in their first year after nesting, leatherback turtles do not fit the general model of migration where responses to resources are suppressed during transit. However, their behavior may be different in their sabbatical years away from nesting beaches. Our results highlight the importance of whole-ocean fishing gear regulations to minimize turtle bycatch.
Language eng
DOI 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[2647:FFMOLT]2.0.CO;2
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Ecological Society of America
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058416

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.