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Jellyfish aggregations and leatherback turtle foraging patterns in a temperate coastal environment

Houghton, Jonathan D.R., Doyle, Thomas K., Wilson, Mark W., Davenport, John and Hays, Graeme C. 2006, Jellyfish aggregations and leatherback turtle foraging patterns in a temperate coastal environment, Ecology, vol. 87, no. 8, pp. 1967-1972, doi: 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[1967:JAALTF]2.0.CO;2.

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Title Jellyfish aggregations and leatherback turtle foraging patterns in a temperate coastal environment
Author(s) Houghton, Jonathan D.R.
Doyle, Thomas K.
Wilson, Mark W.
Davenport, John
Hays, Graeme C.ORCID iD for Hays, Graeme C. orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Ecology
Volume number 87
Issue number 8
Start page 1967
End page 1972
Total pages 6
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Place of publication Ithaca, N.Y.
Publication date 2006-08
ISSN 0012-9658
1939-9170
Keyword(s) aerial survey
Dermochelys coriacea
foraging ecology
gelatinous zooplankton
jellyfish
leatherback turtles
planktivore
predator–prey relationship
Rhizostoma octopus
Summary Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are obligate predators of gelatinous zooplankton. However, the spatial relationship between predator and prey remains poorly understood beyond sporadic and localized reports. To examine how jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria: Orders Semaeostomeae and Rhizostomeae) might drive the broad-scale distribution of this wide ranging species, we employed aerial surveys to map jellyfish throughout a temperate coastal shelf area bordering the northeast Atlantic. Previously unknown, consistent aggregations of Rhizostoma octopus extending over tens of square kilometers were identified in distinct coastal “hotspots” during consecutive years (2003–2005). Examination of retrospective sightings data (>50 yr) suggested that 22.5% of leatherback distribution could be explained by these hotspots, with the inference that these coastal features may be sufficiently consistent in space and time to drive long-term foraging associations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[1967:JAALTF]2.0.CO;2
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Ecological Society of America
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058417

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.