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Procedural learning deficits in specific language impairment (SLI): a meta-analysis of serial reaction time task performance

Lum, Jarrad A. G., Conti-Ramsden, Gina M., Morgan, Angela T. and Ullman, Michael T. 2014, Procedural learning deficits in specific language impairment (SLI): a meta-analysis of serial reaction time task performance, Cortex, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2013.10.011.

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Title Procedural learning deficits in specific language impairment (SLI): a meta-analysis of serial reaction time task performance
Author(s) Lum, Jarrad A. G.ORCID iD for Lum, Jarrad A. G. orcid.org/0000-0003-2098-2403
Conti-Ramsden, Gina M.
Morgan, Angela T.
Ullman, Michael T.
Journal name Cortex
Volume number 51
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier Masson
Place of publication Milan, Italy
Publication date 2014
ISSN 0010-9452
1973-8102
Keyword(s) procedural deficit hypothesis (PDH)
procedural memory
specific language impairment (SLI)
meta-analysis
serial reaction time (SRT) task
Summary Meta-analysis and meta-regression were used to evaluate whether evidence to date demonstrates deficits in procedural memory in individuals with specific language impairment (SLI), and to examine reasons for inconsistencies of findings across studies. The Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH) proposes that SLI is largely explained by abnormal functioning of the frontal-basal ganglia circuits that support procedural memory. It has also been suggested that declarative memory can compensate for at least some of the problems observed in individuals with SLI. A number of studies have used Serial Reaction Time (SRT) tasks to investigate procedural learning in SLI. In this report, results from eight studies that collectively examined 186 participants with SLI and 203 typically-developing peers were submitted to a meta-analysis. The average mean effect size was .328 (CI95: .071, .584) and was significant. This suggests SLI is associated with impairments of procedural learning as measured by the SRT task. Differences among individual study effect sizes, examined with meta-regression, indicated that smaller effect sizes were found in studies with older participants, and in studies that had a larger number of trials on the SRT task. The contributions of age and SRT task characteristics to learning are discussed with respect to impaired and compensatory neural mechanisms in SLI.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.cortex.2013.10.011
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058467

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Tue, 26 Nov 2013, 14:53:33 EST by Jane Moschetti

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