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Evaluation of biogenic amines in the faeces of children with and without autism by LC-MS/MS

Gondalia, Shakuntla V., Mahon, Peter J., Palombo, Enzo A., Knowles, Simon R. and Austin, David W. 2013, Evaluation of biogenic amines in the faeces of children with and without autism by LC-MS/MS, International Journal of Biotechnology and Biochemistry, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 245-255.

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Title Evaluation of biogenic amines in the faeces of children with and without autism by LC-MS/MS
Author(s) Gondalia, Shakuntla V.
Mahon, Peter J.
Palombo, Enzo A.
Knowles, Simon R.
Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Journal name International Journal of Biotechnology and Biochemistry
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Start page 245
End page 255
Total pages 11
Publisher Research India Publications
Place of publication Delhi, India
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0973-2691
0974-4762
Keyword(s) Autism
Chromatography
Faecal
Biogenic amines
ASD
Summary Previous researchers have postulated that gastrointestinal bacteria may contribute to the development and maintenance of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). There is evidence based on quantitative evaluation of the gastrointestinal bacterial population in ASD that this is unlikely and an alternate mechanism will be examined where the bacteria may contribute to the development of ASD via their metabolic products and the role of biogenic amines (BAs) will be investigated. In humans, BAs influence a number of physiological processes via their actions as neurotransmitters, local hormones and gastric acid secretion. Various amines have been implicated in several medical conditions such as schizophrenia and colon cancer. To date, the relationship between BAs and autism has not been explored. This study has been designed to identify differences (and/or similarities) in the level of Bas in faecal samples of autistic children (without gastrointestinal dysfunction: n = 14; with gastrointestinal dysfunction; n = 21) and their neurotypical siblings (n = 35) by LC-MS/MS. Regardless of the diagnosis, severity of ASD and gastrointestinal dysfunction there were no significant differences found between the groups. The findings suggest that BAs in the gastrointestinal tract do not play a role in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal dysfunction associated with ASD.
Language eng
Field of Research 170101
060599
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Research India Publications
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058758

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Created: Thu, 05 Dec 2013, 09:26:03 EST by David Austin

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.