You are not logged in.

Analyzing track sprint cyclists' performances using position-specific maximal-torque and power-cadence relationships

Rouffet, D. M., Dwyer, D. B., Stokes, R. and Fairweather, I. 2012, Analyzing track sprint cyclists' performances using position-specific maximal-torque and power-cadence relationships, in ACSM 2012 : 59th Annual Meeting and 3rd World Congress on Exercise is Medicine : Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine 2012, Lippincott William & Wilkins,, pp. 474-474.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Analyzing track sprint cyclists' performances using position-specific maximal-torque and power-cadence relationships
Author(s) Rouffet, D. M.
Dwyer, D. B.
Stokes, R.
Fairweather, I.
Conference name Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (59th : 2012 : San Francisco, California)
Conference location San Francisco, California
Conference dates 2012
Title of proceedings ACSM 2012 : 59th Annual Meeting and 3rd World Congress on Exercise is Medicine : Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine 2012
Publication date 2012
Start page 474
End page 474
Total pages 1
Publisher Lippincott William & Wilkins
Summary Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of maximal Torque-Cadence (T-C) and Power-Cadence (P-C) relationships, for the performances of world class track sprint cyclists. If these relationships are affected by the function of the lower limb muscles, the ability of cyclists to generate torque and power at a given cadence may vary depending on their riding position. During sprint events (individual and team sprints and Keirin), cyclists alternate between standing and seated positions. The T-C and P-C relationships may change with the position adopted by the cyclists. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the necessity to define position specific maximal T-C and P-C relationships. METHODS: Eight junior elite track cyclists from the National Talent Identification squad undertook two inertial-load tests that consisted of four all-out sprints each. One test was undertaken at the velodrome in a standing position on a carbon fibre track bike, and the other test was completed in a seated position on an air-braked stationary ergometer. A calibrated SRM power meter interfaced to a custom instrumentation package was used for all mechanical measurements. Maximal T-C and P-C relationships were analysed to calculate maximal Torque (T0), maximal Power (Pmax) and optimal pedalling cadence (PCopt). RESULTS: All individual T-C and P-C relationships obtained for both body positions were fitted by linear regressions (r2=0.95 ± 0.02) and second order polynomials (r2=0.96 ± 0.01), respectively. T0 was higher (209 ± 2.2N.m vs. 177.0 ± 3.9N.m, p<0.05), PCopt was lower (112.5 ± 11.4rpm vs. 120.1 ± 6.7rpm, p<0.05), and Pmax was higher (1261 ± 235W vs. 1076 ± 183W, p<0.05) in standing position compared to seated position. CONCLUSION: Analysis of track sprint cyclists’ performances can be improved by the determination of position-specific maximal T-C and P-C relationships .
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category EN.1 Other conference paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058773

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Faculty of Health
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 111 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 05 Dec 2013, 11:21:35 EST by Dan Dwyer

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.