The constructional geometry of early Hindu Javanese temples

Beynon, David and Datta, Sambit 2013, The constructional geometry of early Hindu Javanese temples, in OPEN 2013 : Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Gold Coast, Qld., pp. 327-339.

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Title The constructional geometry of early Hindu Javanese temples
Author(s) Beynon, David
Datta, Sambit
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand. Conference (30th : 2013 : Gold Coast, Queensland)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland
Conference dates 2-5 Jul. 2013
Title of proceedings OPEN 2013 : Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) Brown, Alexandra
Leach, Andrew
Publication date 2013
Conference series Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Start page 327
End page 339
Total pages 13
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Gold Coast, Qld.
Summary The early development of Hindu Javanese architecture can be traced through interpretation of epigraphs, archaeological excavations, and comparison of extant temples with other traditions. However, while many scholars have speculated on connections between Javanese Hindu temples and presumed antecedents in India, these have been made on the basis of visual comparison and epigraphic interpretations. No Indian temple has been conclusively shown to be a model for the earliest Javanese temples. Archaeologist and temple historian Michael Meister has shown in his analysis of the geometric composition of early Hindu temples in South Asia how a ritual sixty-four square mandala was the geometric basis of temple construction during the formative period (fifth to eighth century) of the Indian architectural tradition. Working from an understanding of temple construction sequence as well as their ritual underpinnings, Meister found that the sixtyfour square mandala's dimensions correlate closely to the constructed dimensions at the level of the vedibandha (which corresponds with the plan level of the sanctuary threshold). Furthermore, he shows how the horizontal profile of the cella depends on the number of offsets and the proportional relationships between ech offset based on the subdivision of the sixty-four square grid. The authors have investigated whether a similar compositional basis can be found for the earliest Javanese temples on the Dieng Plateau in the highlands of central Java, despite differences in architectonic and symbolic expression. The analysis of relationships between ritual geometry and actual temple layouts for these buildings has the potential to furthering our understanding of the connections between Hindu temples in Java and those in India.
ISBN 098760550X
9780987605504
Language eng
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
080110 Simulation and Modelling
Socio Economic Objective 950502 Understanding Asia's Past
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2013
Copyright notice ©2013, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058801

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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