You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Opportunistic destinations : transforming railway stations into sustainable urban centres

Juvara, Martina and Roos, Phillip 2012, Opportunistic destinations : transforming railway stations into sustainable urban centres, in Urban Design 2012 : Opportunistic urban design : Proceedings of the 5th International Urban Design Conference, AST Management, Nerang, Qld., pp. 110-119.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
juvara-opportunisticdestinations-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 973.56KB 87

Title Opportunistic destinations : transforming railway stations into sustainable urban centres
Author(s) Juvara, Martina
Roos, PhillipORCID iD for Roos, Phillip orcid.org/0000-0002-5571-1059
Conference name Urban Design. Conference (5th : 2012 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 10-12 Sep. 2012
Title of proceedings Urban Design 2012 : Opportunistic urban design : Proceedings of the 5th International Urban Design Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2012
Conference series Urban Design Conference
Start page 110
End page 119
Total pages 10
Publisher AST Management
Place of publication Nerang, Qld.
Keyword(s) opportunistic design
urban centres
public spaces
master planning
Summary All over the world stations are changing to become new urban centres and destinations. Some flagship projects, like Atocha in Madrid or Grand Central in Manhattan, make great destinations with shops, restaurants, museums and exhibition spaces. The urban spaces around them have been redesigned to provide excellent public areas and rationalise functional needs. Suburban stations also have the potential to follow the same trend. After all, stations are places of high symbolic value, they are central to the life of many people and include all sections of society, while generating high footfall and stimulating the economy. For this reason, Station Master Planning must focus on 'place' as well as 'product' to respond to the multiple opportunities. Considering the need that designs of stations need to be sustainable and preserve and value the public spaces, this paper reflects on the case study of the station master plan of the Tottenham Hale Station in London where SKM Colin Buchanan applied opportunistic urban design principles and created a new, significant urban square for north London and a local destination for leisure and investment. The design methodology are transferred to the local context of Melbourne where the unique spatial circumstances of suburban stations along the New Regional Rail Link line are reviewed, highlighting how these stations possesses specific opportunistic and sustainable urban design answers.
ISBN 9780980814774
Language eng
Field of Research 120508 Urban Design
120506 Transport Planning
120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
Socio Economic Objective 960399 Climate and Climate Change not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, AST Management
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058819

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 119 Abstract Views, 87 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 09 Dec 2013, 10:46:57 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.