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Railway stations : public realm gateways to sustainable futures of our cities

Roos, Phillip 2013, Railway stations : public realm gateways to sustainable futures of our cities, in UrbanAgiNation : Proceedings of the 6th International Urban Design Conference, Urban Design Australia, Nerang, Qld., pp. 157-171.

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Title Railway stations : public realm gateways to sustainable futures of our cities
Author(s) Roos, PhillipORCID iD for Roos, Phillip orcid.org/0000-0002-5571-1059
Conference name International Urban Design. Conference (2013 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 9-11 Sep. 2013
Title of proceedings UrbanAgiNation : Proceedings of the 6th International Urban Design Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2013
Conference series International Urban Design Conference
Start page 157
End page 171
Total pages 15
Publisher Urban Design Australia
Place of publication Nerang, Qld.
Keyword(s) railway station design
sustainable design
regeneration
sustainable urban centres
public spaces
and signature architecture
Summary Train stations are places of connection in our cities and are the gateways of urban space. They represent one of the most exciting places to experience. Some stations make great destinations offering shops, restaurants, museums and exhibition spaces to commuters. While new architecture at railway stations acknowledges heritage, the urban spaces around them provide excellent public areas and rationalise functional needs. Grand spaces with monumental structures, including constant movement of people and trains makes for an exhilarating experience. Modern or historic, great train stations add another level of excitement in the regeneration of our cities. Adding into the mix of the sustainability paradigm, place making of railway stations transforms into sustainable urban centres and signature architecture, but how does it support an environmentally sustainable future? This paper reflects the journey of exploring the challenging situations of balancing the requirements between historic, operational, functional, economic and innovative sustainable design solutions during the Flinders Street Station Design Competition in Melbourne. The author highlights how the unique spatial, social and cultural circumstance of this world-renowned city railway station possesses specific resilient and sustainable design answers to a public realm and city space that challenges established thinking.
Language eng
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)
120508 Urban Design
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2013
Copyright notice ©2013, Urban Design Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058820

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.