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Errors in the identification of question types in investigative interviews of children

Powell, Martine B, Benson, Mairi S, Sharman, Stefanie J, Guadagno, Belinda and Steinberg, Rebecca 2013, Errors in the identification of question types in investigative interviews of children, International Journal of Police Science and Management, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 144-156, doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.2.308.

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Title Errors in the identification of question types in investigative interviews of children
Author(s) Powell, Martine BORCID iD for Powell, Martine B orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Benson, Mairi S
Sharman, Stefanie JORCID iD for Sharman, Stefanie J orcid.org/0000-0002-0635-047X
Guadagno, Belinda
Steinberg, Rebecca
Journal name International Journal of Police Science and Management
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 144
End page 156
Total pages 13
Publisher Vathek Publishing
Place of publication Dalby, Isle of Man
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1461-3557
1478-1603
Keyword(s) Investigative interviews
Practice
Question types
Interview training
Summary This study examined the incidence and nature of the errors made by trainee coders during their coding of question types in interviews in which children disclosed abuse. Three groups of trainees (online, postgraduate and police) studied the coding manual before practising their question coding. After this practice, participants were given two-page field transcripts to code in which children disclosed abuse. Their coding was assessed for accuracy; any errors were analysed thematically. The overall error rate was low, and police participants made the fewest errors. Analysis of the errors revealed four common misunderstandings: (1) the use of a ‘wh’ question always denotes a specific cued-recall question; (2) ‘Tell me’ always constitutes an open-ended question; (3) open-ended questions cannot include specific detail; and (4) specific questions cannot elicit elaborate responses. An analysis of coding accuracy in the one group who were able to practise question coding over time revealed that practice was essential for trainees to maintain their accuracy. Those who did not practise decreased in coding accuracy. This research shows that trainees need more than a coding manual; they must demonstrate their understanding of question codes through practice training tasks. Misunderstandings about questions need to be elicited and corrected so that accurate codes are used in future tasks.
Language eng
DOI 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.2.308
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Vathek Publishing
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058925

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Created: Tue, 10 Dec 2013, 12:36:45 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.