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Early childhood predictors of toddlers' physical activity: longitudinal findings from the Melbourne InFANT program

Hnatiuk, Jill, Salmon, Jo, Campbell, Karen J., Ridgers, Nicola D. and Hesketh, Kylie D. 2013, Early childhood predictors of toddlers' physical activity: longitudinal findings from the Melbourne InFANT program, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 10, no. 123, pp. 1-9.

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Title Early childhood predictors of toddlers' physical activity: longitudinal findings from the Melbourne InFANT program
Author(s) Hnatiuk, Jill
Salmon, Jo
Campbell, Karen J.
Ridgers, Nicola D.
Hesketh, Kylie D.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 10
Issue number 123
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-11-05
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) early childhood
physical activity
toddlers
infant
maternal behaviour
home environment
Summary Background: 
Young children are at risk of not meeting physical activity recommendations. Identifying factors from the first year of life which influence toddlers’ physical activity levels may help to develop targeted intervention strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine early childhood predictors of toddlers’ physical activity across the domains of maternal beliefs and behaviours, infant behaviours and the home environment. 

Methods:
Data from 206 toddlers (53% male) participating in the Melbourne InFANT Program were collected in 2008–2010 and analysed in 2012. Mothers completed a survey of physical activity predictors when their child was 4- (T1) and 9- months old (T2). Physical activity was assessed by ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers at 19- months (T3) of age.

Results:
One infant behaviour at T1 and one maternal belief and two infant behaviours at T2 showed associations with physical activity at T3 and were included in multivariate analyses. After adjusting for the age at which the child started walking and maternal education, the time spent with babies of a similar age at 4-months (β = 0.06, 95% CI [0.02, 0.10]) and the time spent being physically active with their mother at 9-months (β = 0.06, 95% CI [0.01, 0.12]) predicted children’s physical activity at 19-months of age. 

Conclusions:
Promotion of peer-interactions and maternal-child co-participation in physical activity could serve as a health promotion strategy to increase physical activity in young children. Future research is required to identify other early life predictors not assessed in this study and to examine whether these factors predict physical activity in later life stages.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30058935

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.