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Problem gambling and family violence : family member reports of prevalence, family impacts and family coping

Suomi, Aino, Jackson, Alun C., Dowling, Nicki A., Lavis, Tiffany, Patford, Janet, Thomas, Shane A., Harvey, Peter, Abbott, Max, Bellringer, Maria E., Koziol-McLain, Jane and Cockman, Sue 2013, Problem gambling and family violence : family member reports of prevalence, family impacts and family coping, Asian journal of gambling issues and public health, vol. 3, Article Number : 13, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/2195-3007-3-13.

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Title Problem gambling and family violence : family member reports of prevalence, family impacts and family coping
Author(s) Suomi, Aino
Jackson, Alun C.
Dowling, Nicki A.ORCID iD for Dowling, Nicki A. orcid.org/0000-0001-8592-2407
Lavis, Tiffany
Patford, Janet
Thomas, Shane A.
Harvey, PeterORCID iD for Harvey, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2983-663X
Abbott, Max
Bellringer, Maria E.
Koziol-McLain, Jane
Cockman, Sue
Journal name Asian journal of gambling issues and public health
Volume number 3
Season Article Number : 13
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2195-3007
Keyword(s) problem gambling
family violence
family impact
family coping
Summary There exists only a small number of empirical studies investigating the patterns of family violence in problem gambling populations, although some evidence exists that intimate partner violence and child abuse are among the most severe interpersonal correlates of problem gambling. The current article reports on the Australian arm of a large-scale study of the patterns and prevalence of co-occurrence of family violence and problem gambling in Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong. The current study screened 120 help-seeking family members of problem gamblers in a range of clinical services for both family violence and problem gambling. The main results showed that 52.5% reported some form of family violence in the past 12 months: 20.0% reported only victimisation, 10.8% reported only perpetration and 21.6% reported both victimisation and perpetration of family violence. Parents, current and ex-partners were most likely to be both perpetrators and victims of family violence. There were no gender differences in reciprocal violence but females were more likely to be only victims and less likely to report no violence in comparison to males. Most of the 32 participants interviewed in depth, reported that gambling generally preceded family violence. The findings suggest that perpetration of family violence was more likely to occur as a reaction to deeply-rooted and accumulated anger and mistrust whereas victimisation was an outcome of gambler’s anger brought on by immediate gambling losses and frustration. While multiple and intertwined negative family impacts were likely to occur in the presence of family violence, gambling-related coping strategies were not associated with the presence or absence of family violence. The implications of the findings for service providers are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/2195-3007-3-13
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059010

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Mon, 16 Dec 2013, 14:08:52 EST by Nicki Dowling

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