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Multitasking, working memory and remembering intentions

Logie, Robert H., Law, Anna, Trawley, Steven and Nissan, Jack 2010, Multitasking, working memory and remembering intentions, Psychologica Belgica, vol. 50, no. 3-4, pp. 309-326.

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Title Multitasking, working memory and remembering intentions
Author(s) Logie, Robert H.
Law, Anna
Trawley, StevenORCID iD for Trawley, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-0917-730X
Nissan, Jack
Journal name Psychologica Belgica
Volume number 50
Issue number 3-4
Start page 309
End page 326
Total pages 18
Publisher Ingenta
Place of publication Cambridge, Mass.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 0033-2879
Keyword(s) multitasking
prospective memory
virtual reality
Summary Multitasking refers to the performance of a range of tasks that have to be completed within a limited time period. it differs from dual task paradigms in that tasks are performed not in parallel, but by interleaving, switching from one to the other. it differs also from task switching paradigms in that the time scale is very much longer, multiple different tasks are involved, and most tasks have a clear end point. Multitasking has been studied extensively with particular sets of experts such as in aviation and in the military, and impairments of multitasking performance have been studied in patients with frontal lobe lesions. Much less is known as to how multitasking is achieved in healthy adults who have not had specific training in the necessary skills. This paper will provide a brief review of research on everyday multitasking, and summarise the results of some recent experiments on simulated everyday tasks chosen to require advance and on-line planning, retrospective memory, prospective memory, and visual, spatial and verbal short-term memory.
Language eng
Field of Research 170201 Computer Perception, Memory and Attention
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Ubiquity Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059016

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Created: Mon, 16 Dec 2013, 19:47:42 EST by Steven Trawley

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.