Training characteristics of elite Australian rowers: training volume, loading patterns, and training variety

Tran, J., Rice, A., Main, L. C. and Gastin, P. 2013, Training characteristics of elite Australian rowers: training volume, loading patterns, and training variety, in ACSMS 2013 : Abstracts of the Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport 2013, [The Conference], Mitchell, ACT, pp. 1-1.

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Title Training characteristics of elite Australian rowers: training volume, loading patterns, and training variety
Author(s) Tran, J.
Rice, A.
Main, L. C.
Gastin, P.
Conference name Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport (2013 : Phuket, Thailand)
Conference location Phuket, Thailand
Conference dates 23-25 Oct. 2013
Title of proceedings ACSMS 2013 : Abstracts of the Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport 2013
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2013
Conference series Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher [The Conference]
Place of publication Mitchell, ACT
Summary Introduction: As training intervention studies are not often feasible in elite sport, observing the current strategies used by elite athletes is necessary to provide insight into current best practice and inform future training planning and prescription. However, there is paucity of research documenting recent practices in elite rowing, with the available data lacking details regarding training organisation (e.g., loading patterns, the structure of training specificity and variety). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to document the training volume and training patterns of elite rowers over six months of domestic preparations. Methods: 19 elite Australian rowers (14 males, 5 females) participated. Training was monitored for six months, comprising a specific preparation phase (P1; 12 weeks) and a domestic competition phase (P2; 12 weeks). Training data were analysed for the whole sample and grouped by sex. Training load was quantified using external measures of volume (training duration and distance rowed), and a validated, in-house proprietary measure of internal load known as the T2minute method. Results: In P1, external training volumes averaged 18.3±1.9 h and 111.9±43.7 km rowed per week. The average weekly internal training load was 1092±150 T2minutes. In P2, 16.9±3.4 h of training was completed, with 110.4 ± 24.2 km were rowed per week. Average weekly internal load in P2 was 1110±222 T2minutes. The loading pattern typically fluctuated on a four-week cycle, with the highest training loads occurring in weeks 3 or 4 of a cycle. In P1, on-water rowing predominated (54.1±17.9% of total training duration), followed by non-rowing training (37.8±16.8%), and ergometer rowing (8.1±3.2%). In P2, the proportion of time spent in on-water training increased to 61.3±12.4%, with concomitant decreases in non-rowing training (31.6±12.2%). Male rowers completed a greater relative proportion of rowing specific training than female rowers (males 91.8±4.5% vs. females 79.8±14.1% of total T2minute load; males 71.7±5.9% vs. females 51.7±17.6% of total training duration). Conclusion: Compared to previous reports, the rowers in this study completed similar or slightly lower training volumes and similar distances rowed. This research contributes new data that illustrates how prescribed fluctuations in training loads are realised. In addition, the data indicates that the training of elite Australian rowers is more varied, with greater distribution of training load to non-rowing modes, than what has been previously reported.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059191

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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