Openly accessible

The stress of fire fighting - implications for long term health outcomes

Main, Luana C., Raines, Jenni, Della, Gatta Paul, Wolkow, Alex, Snow, Rod and Aisbett, Brad 2012, The stress of fire fighting - implications for long term health outcomes, in AFAC & Bushfire CRC Conference Research Forum 2012 : Proceedings of the Bushfire CRC & AFAC Research Forum 2012, Bushfire CRC, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 160-169.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
main-stressoffirefighting-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 621.55KB 9

Title The stress of fire fighting - implications for long term health outcomes
Author(s) Main, Luana C.
Raines, Jenni
Della, Gatta Paul
Wolkow, Alex
Snow, Rod
Aisbett, Brad
Conference name Bushfire CRC & AFAC Conference Research Forum (2012 : Perth, WA)
Conference location Perth, WA
Conference dates 28 Aug. 2012
Title of proceedings AFAC & Bushfire CRC Conference Research Forum 2012 : Proceedings of the Bushfire CRC & AFAC Research Forum 2012
Editor(s) Thornton, R. P.
Wright, L. J.
Publication date 2012
Conference series Bushfire CRC & AFAC Conference Research Forum
Start page 160
End page 169
Total pages 10
Publisher Bushfire CRC
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Fire and rescue staff routinely endure significant psychological and environmental stress exposure on the job. While much has been done to improve understanding of the physiological effects of exposure to these conditions, little has been done to quantify the inflammatory stress response that firefighters are exposed to during wildfire suppression. Therefore the aim of the present study was to explore whether firefighters experienced a change in inflammatory markers following one day, and across two days of wildfire suppression tasks. Twelve male fire-fighters participated in two consecutive days of live-fire prescribed burn operations in Ngarkat National Park, South Australia. Typical work tasks included lighting burns, patrolling containment lines, supressing spot fires, and operating vehicles. A number of the inflammatory markers changed significantly across the course of a shift and several presented with an attenuated response across the second day. This finding implies that there was a compounding effect of repeated exposure to these stressors which could have considerable implications for managing fire-fighters health and wellbeing over a multi-day campaign. Further research is required to see which fire ground stressor, or combination of stressors is causing these changes in the inflammatory markers across consecutive work shifts.
ISBN 9780980675962
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, Bushfire CRC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059204

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 12 Abstract Views, 9 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 08 Jan 2014, 12:57:59 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.