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Antimicrobial stewardship: the need to cover all bases

Friedman, N. Deborah 2013, Antimicrobial stewardship: the need to cover all bases, Antibiotics, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 400-418, doi: 10.3390/antibiotics2030400.

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Title Antimicrobial stewardship: the need to cover all bases
Author(s) Friedman, N. Deborah
Journal name Antibiotics
Volume number 2
Issue number 3
Start page 400
End page 418
Total pages 19
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2079-6382
Keyword(s) antimicrobial
stewardship
resistance
antibiotics
Summary Increasing antimicrobial resistance has necessitated an approach to guide the use of antibiotics. The necessity to guide antimicrobial use via stewardship has never been more urgent. The decline in anti-infective innovation and the failure of currently available antimicrobials to treat some serious infections forces clinicians to change those behaviors that drive antimicrobial resistance. The majority of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs function in acute-care hospitals, however, hospitals are only one setting where antibiotics are prescribed. Antimicrobial use is also high in residential aged care facilities and in the community. Prescribing in aged care is influenced by the fact that elderly residents have lowered immunity, are susceptible to infection and are frequently colonized with multi-resistant organisms. While in the community, prescribers are faced with public misconceptions about the effectiveness of antibiotics for many upper respiratory tract illnesses. AMS programs in all of these locations must be sustainable over a long period of time in order to be effective. A future with effective antimicrobials to treat bacterial infection will depend on AMS covering all of these bases. This review discusses AMS in acute care hospitals, aged care and the community and emphasizes that AMS is critical to patient safety and relies on government, clinician and community engagement.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/antibiotics2030400
Field of Research 110309 Infectious Diseases
110801 Medical Bacteriology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059330

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.