You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers

Friedman, N. Deborah, Pollard, James, Stupart, Douglas, Knight, Daniel R., Khajehnoori, Masoomeh, Davey, Elise K., Parry, Louise and Riley, Thomas V. 2013, Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers, BMC infectious diseases, vol. 13, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-13-459.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
friedman-prevalenceclostridium-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 311.52KB 2

Title Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers
Formatted title Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers
Author(s) Friedman, N. Deborah
Pollard, James
Stupart, Douglas
Knight, Daniel R.
Khajehnoori, Masoomeh
Davey, Elise K.
Parry, Louise
Riley, Thomas V.
Journal name BMC infectious diseases
Volume number 13
Article ID 459
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-10-04
ISSN 1471-2334
Keyword(s) Clostridium dificile
colonization
healthcare workers
Summary Background
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased to epidemic proportions in recent years. The carriage of C. difficile among healthy adults and hospital inpatients has been established. We sought to determine whether C. difficile colonization exists among healthcare workers (HCWs) in our setting.

Methods
A point prevalence study of stool colonization with C. difficile among doctors, nurses and allied health staff at a large regional teaching hospital in Geelong, Victoria. All participants completed a short questionnaire and all stool specimens were tested by Techlab® C.diff Quik Check enzyme immunoassay followed by enrichment culture.

Results
Among 128 healthcare workers, 77% were female, of mean age 43 years, and the majority were nursing staff (73%). Nineteen HCWs (15%) reported diarrhoea, and 12 (9%) had taken antibiotics in the previous six weeks. Over 40% of participants reported having contact with a patient with known or suspected CDI in the 6 weeks before the stool was collected. C. difficile was not isolated from the stool of any participants.

Conclusion

Although HCWs are at risk of asymptomatic carriage and could act as a reservoir for transmission in the hospital environment, with the use of a screening test and culture we were unable to identify C. difficile in the stool of our participants in a non-outbreak setting. This may reflect potential colonization resistance of the gut microbiota, or the success of infection prevention strategies at our institution.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-13-459
Field of Research 110309 Infectious Diseases
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059333

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 49 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 08 Jan 2014, 13:31:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.