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Exploring Aboriginal People's connection to country to strengthen human-nature theoretical perspectives

Kingsley, Jonathan Yotti, Townsend, Mardie and Henderson-Wilson, Claire 2013, Exploring Aboriginal People's connection to country to strengthen human-nature theoretical perspectives, in Advances in Medical Sociology, Volume 15, Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health, Emerald Group Publishing, Bingley, UK, pp.45-64.

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Title Exploring Aboriginal People's connection to country to strengthen human-nature theoretical perspectives
Author(s) Kingsley, Jonathan Yotti
Townsend, Mardie
Henderson-Wilson, Claire
Title of book Advances in Medical Sociology, Volume 15, Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health
Editor(s) Gislason, Maya K
Publication date 2013
Chapter number 3
Total chapters 15
Start page 45
End page 64
Total pages 20
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of Publication Bingley, UK
Keyword(s) Aboriginal people
Human-nature relationship
Biophilia
Topophilia
solastalgia
Place
Summary Purpose
Aboriginal people across Australia have diverse practices, beliefs and knowledges based on thousands of generations of managing and protecting their lands (Country). The intimate relationship Aboriginal people have with their Country is explored in this chapter because such knowledge is important for building insight into the relationship between social and ecological systems. Often in research Aboriginal views have been marginalised from discussions focused on their lands to the detriment of ecosystems and human health. This chapter aims to understand if such marginalisation is evident in Western human–nature relationship discourses.

Approach
This chapter provides a critical literature review which examines whether Aboriginal people’s diverse understanding of their ecosystems have been incorporated into human–nature theories using the biophilia hypothesis as a starting point. Other concepts explored include solastalgia, topophilia and place.

Findings
Critiques of these terminologies in the context of Aboriginal people’s connection to Country are limited but such incorporation is viewed in the chapter as a possible mechanism for better understanding human’s connection to nature. The review identified that Aboriginal people’s relationship to Country seems to be underrepresented in the human–nature theory literature.

Value
This chapter emphasises that the integration of Aboriginal perspectives into research, ecological management and policy can provide better insight into the interrelationships between social and ecological systems.
ISBN 9781781903230
ISSN 1057-6290
Language eng
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
111712 Health Promotion
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category B2 Book chapter in non-commercially published book
Copyright notice ©2013, Emerald Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30059384

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.